feather

All Noun Adjective
11,592 examples (0.07 sec)
  • They soon develop feathers and can fly shortly before they are two weeks old.
  • The part of its face not covered by feathers has red skin.
  • Feather's work has been heard on numerous records, in films and on television.
  • There are several types of feathers, each serving its own set of purposes.
  • In some species, the central feathers in the tail are extended into long points.
  • It seemed as if a feather's weight on either side would turn the scale. Cited from The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 2, August, 1862, by Various
  • Poland used red and green feathers, and some versions have used an eye instead.
  • In flight, the long wings show large areas of black and brown on the flight feathers.
  • He had lost his feathers and was naked for much of his life.
  • The back and head are brown, and the wings are brown with black flight feathers.
  • They have eleven strong primary feathers and long pointed wings giving them a fast direct flight.
  • The wing is long and pointed with a highly reduced first primary feather.
  • Some species may have mixed feathers elsewhere on the body as well.
  • New feathers then push out the old ones before finishing their growth.
  • The object of the game is to get the ball as close to the feather as possible.
  • One method to keep these together is to make a feather stick.
  • However, compared to land birds, they have far more feathers protecting their bodies.
  • Through this trade, the feathers reached the far north and the far south of New Zealand.
  • The female is smaller with blue-grey feet and without crown feathering.
  • The yellow feathers were added but otherwise he retained the baby-bird shape.
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Meaning of feather

  • noun The light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
  • noun Turning an oar parallel to the water between pulls
  • verb Join tongue and groove, in carpentry
  • verb Cover or fit with feathers
  • verb Turn the paddle; in canoeing
  • verb Turn the oar, while rowing