favour of the pretender

18 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Fortune at first seemed to have declared in favour of the pretender. Cited from Prolegomena, Julius Wellhausen
  • Nor was there ever among us the least attempt towards an insurrection in favour of the Pretender. Cited from Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, Vol. VI; The Drapier's Letters, by Swift
  • Province after province declared in favour of the pretender, chief after chief placed his sword at his service, and Pugatscheff began to play the emperor in earnest. Cited from Celebrated Claimants from Perkin Warbeck to Arthur Orton, by Anonymous
  • The ministry of Great Britain indeed alleged, that the Spanish king had entered into engagements in favour of the pretender. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II, by Tobias Smollett
  • But none of the three Tracts contain anything that could possibly be interpreted as a serious argument in favour of the Pretender. Cited from Daniel Defoe, by William Minto
  • Cardinal Alberoni had likewise formed a scheme in favour of the pretender. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II, by Tobias Smollett
  • The Whigs wished to maintain it as a safeguard against reaction in favour of the Pretender. Cited from Letters to Sir William Windham and Mr. Pope
  • The cavaliers or Jacobites had always foreseen that this union would extinguish all their hopes of a revolution in favour of the pretender. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II, by Tobias Smollett
  • Of the men who had been in power under the late reign, many were discarded, and most of the others were too much taken up with the thoughts of securing themselves under this, to receive applications in favour of the Pretender. Cited from Letters to Sir William Windham and Mr. Pope
  • The warning and caution was expressly directed against the insinuations that the Ministry were in favour of the Pretender. Cited from Daniel Defoe, by William Minto
  • They did not doubt of being able to maintain the superiority which they had acquired in parliament; and perhaps some of them cherished views in favour of the pretender, whose succession to the crown would have effectually established their dominion over the opposite party. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II, by Tobias Smollett
  • Not content with this, the King of Scots, with Perkin in his company, invaded England, in the hope that the adherents of the York family would rise in favour of the pretender. Cited from Celebrated Claimants from Perkin Warbeck to Arthur Orton, by Anonymous
  • To effect this, they kindly gave us intelligence, that when the Spaniards should receive their treasures from the Western Indies, they designed to employ it in favour of the pretender, and that, therefore, it was necessary to intercept it. Cited from The Works of Samuel Johnson, Vol. 10., by Samuel Johnson
  • He excused himself afterwards by saying that he was not aware of the Jacobite leanings of the Ministry; that none of them ever said one word in favour of the Pretender to him; that he saw no reason to believe that they did favour the Pretender. Cited from Daniel Defoe, by William Minto
  • The great rebellion of 1715, for which Mar was responsible, was stirred up by him in favour of the Pretender, and succeeded so far as to bring the Chevalier to Scotland. Cited from The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Vol. VII, by Jonathan Swift
  • Some of the leading Tories were making preparations for a revolution in favour of the Pretender, but the death of Anne came before their preparations were complete, and George of Hanover was quietly proclaimed as George I. Cited from With Marlborough to Malplaquet, by Herbert Strang and Richard Stead
  • He repaired to the court of St. Germain's, where he undertook to assemble a body of twelve thousand highlanders to act in favour of the pretender, if the court of France would assist them with a small reinforcement of troops, together with officers, arms, ammunition, and money. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II, by Tobias Smollett
  • The affair showed conclusively how small was the danger in England of a Yorkist rising in favour of the pretender -- a fact very fully recognised by Ferdinand and Isabella, though Maximilian clung pertinaciously to his protege. Cited from England Under the Tudors, by Arthur D. Innes