facial asymmetry

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  • In some cases after surgery there may be facial asymmetry which might require reoperation.
  • For other individuals, it can develop over time, often because one half of the jaw is longer than the other, leading to facial asymmetry.
  • Diagnosis can be made solely on the basis of history and physical examination in people who present with only facial asymmetry.
  • Progressive changes occurring throughout life in the soft tissues of the face will cause more prominent facial asymmetry in older faces.
  • This word particularly describes a flattening which is to one side at the back of the head and there is often some facial asymmetry.
  • Chirality is also seen in the study of facial asymmetry.
  • Other eye doctors recommend surgery early in a patient's life to prevent the compensatory torticollis and facial asymmetry that develop with age.
  • Stigmata: slight facial asymmetry, ears very long and narrow, dentition very irregular -- one upper canine having erupted behind the central incisors. Cited from Pathology of Lying, Etc. by William and Mary Healy
  • These include facial asymmetry, a prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, a broad nasal bridge, a wide, fleshy nasal tip, and mild prognathism.
  • Distinguishing features in another study were a large or late-closing anterior fontanelle (up to 85% of patients) and facial asymmetry.
  • A child born with asymmetrical unilateral coronal synostosis should undergo cranioplasty within its first year of life in order to prevent increased intracranial pressure and to prevent progressive facial asymmetry.
  • If cranioplasty is not performed, especially in individuals with unilateral coronal synostosis, then facial asymmetry will get worse and worse over time, which is why cranioplasty should be performed as soon as possible.
  • Most patients with congenital CN IV palsy have facial asymmetry due to the chronic head tilt.
  • If torticollis is not corrected, facial asymmetry often develops.
  • It can cause painless facial asymmetry, diplopia and enophthalmos.
  • Spencer was born without the muscle levator palpebrae superioris in his right upper eyelid, leading to permanent ptosis (drooping of the upper eyelid) and noticeable facial asymmetry.
  • There was at first a slight facial asymmetry and a depression on the left upper jaw caused by the point of the left shoulder, against which it had been pressed in the cyst; these soon disappeared, and on the nineteenth day the boy weighed 12 pounds. Cited from Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, Gould/Pyle
  • Although closed reduction carries a risk of the bone healing out of position, with consequent alteration of the bite or the creation of facial asymmetry, it does not risk temporary damage to the facial nerve or result in any facial scar that accompanies open reduction.
  • This research, based on detailed study of the skeletons, vindicates Andronikos and sustains the facial asymmetry caused by a possible trauma of the cranium of the male, an evidence that is consistent with the history of Philip II.
  • Multiple features are characteristic for CFND such as craniosynostosis of the coronal sutures (prematurely closed cranial sutures), dry frizzy curled hair, splitting of the nails and facial asymmetry.
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