exhaustive treatise

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  • The student of medicine must gain information by consulting large works and exhaustive treatises on this interesting subject. Cited from People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English, by R.V. Pierce
  • This work is the only thoroughly reliable and exhaustive treatise published on this important subject. Cited from Watch and Clock Escapements, by Anonymous
  • Since then many observations have been made on this subject, and quite recently Laurent has published a most exhaustive treatise upon it. Cited from Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, Gould/Pyle
  • The book under consideration is an able and exhaustive treatise and must become highly prized as a textbook. Cited from The Bay State Monthly - Volume 1, Issue 4 - April, 1884, by Various
  • Many scholarly and exhaustive treatises on various aspects of the subject are, as might be expected, to be found in German. Cited from German Culture Past and Present, by Ernest Belfort Bax
  • THIS little volume (the result of meditation and experience) is not intended as an exhaustive treatise on the much-written-upon subject of the power of thought. Cited from As A Man Thinketh, by James Allen
  • I shall not attempt any exhaustive treatise on this subject, for the task is beyond me, but a slight notice of ancient theology may not here be irrelevant. Cited from Folk Lore, by James Napier
  • His project had expanded into an exhaustive treatise on graphic art in 4 vols.
  • The medical literature of the day abounds in exhaustive treatises on the subject of appendicitis and its surgical treatment. Cited from Appendicitis, by John H. Tilden, M.D.
  • No man has time to write a treatise which shall embody the entire practice of the game; and even if such an exhaustive treatise were written, no man would ever have time to master its instructions. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 30, Apr, 1860
  • To offer an exhaustive treatise on the manifold varieties of Chess problems is not within the scope of this book. Cited from Chess and Checkers, by Edward Lasker
  • To judge such it performance as if it professed to be an exhaustive Treatise in casuistry, is to subject it to tests which it was never designed to bear. Cited from On Compromise, by John Morley
  • It requires no profound knowledge to reach the conclusion that the time has not yet come for an exhaustive treatise on the religion of Babylonia and Assyria. Cited from The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, by Morris Jastrow
  • Those, however, whose tastes carry them to such lengths in vine-culture will be sure to purchase exhaustive treatises on the subject, and will therefore give no heed to these simple practical chapters. Cited from The Home Acre, by E. P. Roe
  • It should be understood that I do not profess to give exhaustive treatises on each of the numerous subjects comprised in this volume, but only such information as is not generally known among travellers. Cited from The Art of Travel, by Francis Galton
  • His voluminous and exhaustive treatise on Civil Law remained a text-book for centuries, and was a foundation for the Writings of all later Roman jurists. Cited from Latin Literature, by J. W. Mackail
  • Neither would it be necessary, or desirable, for the last word in detailed description has been said long ago in the two wonderfully exhaustive treatises on the subject by Dr. Bruce. Cited from Northumberland Yesterday and To-day, by Jean F. Terry
  • Raghavan has completed a work on the mathematical rhythmic patterns and is working on an exhaustive treatise on the raagas.
  • The Bishop Museum has undertaken to make a complete survey and report of all the ancient remains, while Dr. Brigham has almost finished for publication an exhaustive treatise which will include all his observations and deductions along the same lines. Cited from Archeological Investigations, by Gerard Fowke
  • And yet no two children are alike, and if any schoolmaster tried to write an exhaustive treatise on the subject of education, it would have to contain as many chapters as there are boys and girls in the world, and it would not be one of the thinnest books ever published. Cited from The Greylock, by Georg Ebers
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