exhausters

All Noun
20 examples (0.02 sec)
  • It even has functional air exhausters sculpted into its rear fascia.
  • The first floor (ground level) housed many associated machinery items including both electric and steam powered exhausters, a wash box and tram cart.
  • Exhausters were optional components and could be placed anywhere along the purifying process but were most often placed after the condensers and immediately before the gas entered the gas holders.
  • But they could not have anticipated the phenomenal force required by Cell 4 - even with all eight exhausters running the suction was insufficient.
  • A 12 horsepower engine was used to drive the pumps or the exhausters powering this system.
  • Such condensers use steam ejectors or rotary motor-driven exhausters for continuous removal of air and gases from the steam side to maintain vacuum.
  • This has prevented the employment of cylinders of large dimensions; and, consequently, when the quantity of gas to be dealt with has been considerable, the number of exhausters has had to be increased. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 508, September 26, 1885, by Various
  • It may be placed in the open air; and therefore its establishment is attended with less outlay than is the case with other exhausters, which have to be placed under cover, and provided with driving machinery and, of course, a supply of steam. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 508, September 26, 1885, by Various
  • Each unit had boilers manufactured by John Thompson of Wolverhampton, each using two suction ball mills each with two exhausters, these feeding to twelve front wall pulverized fuel burners.
  • N. Dobrokhotov proposed to equip open-hearth furnaces with fans for air supply, with smoke exhausters for removal of combustion products, with front wall without arch and improved refrigerators.
  • Exhausters constructed on the above-named principle have hitherto, M. Meizel says, been costly to fit up, owing to the necessity for providing machinery and special mechanism for the transmission of motion. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 508, September 26, 1885, by Various
  • All items of gas manufacture, such as retort houses, exhausters, condensers, gasification plants, scrubbers, washers, purifiers, have been demolished.
  • The leather flaps over the holes in the exhausters sometimes get too tight by shrinkage so that they will not let the air escape readily, and consequently the pedals come up slowly, often making it difficult to keep the instrument sufficiently supplied with power. Cited from Piano Tuning, by J. Cree Fischer
  • In order to obviate this inconvenience (which exists notwithstanding the use of the best washers), exhausters are employed to draw the gas from the retorts and force it into the washers. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 446, July 19, 1884, by Various
  • Industrial Exhausters - This is a relatively inexpensive, medium-duty, steeply inclined flat-bladed fan for exhausting gases, conveying chips, etc.
  • By its quiet and regular action, it prevents oscillation and unsteadiness in the flow of gas in the hydraulic main, as well as in the pipes leading therefrom -- a defect which has been found to exist with other exhausters. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 508, September 26, 1885, by Various
  • Exhausters of this type (which, M. Meizel says, could be made available for ventilation purposes, in case of necessity) may be constructed of all sizes, from 500 cubic feet per hour upward. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 508, September 26, 1885, by Various
  • The result of this has been inconvenience, which has led to a preference being shown for other kinds of exhausters, notwithstanding the manifest advantages which, in M. Meizel's opinion, those of the reciprocating type possess. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 508, September 26, 1885, by Various
  • The brick and masonry portion of the eastern wing was re-fitted with 3 exhausters and the steel and galvanized iron portion upgraded to contain 4 more purifiers adding to a total of 8.
  • The principal advantages to be gained by the use of this exhauster are stated by M. Meizel to be the following: Considerably less motive force is necessary than is the case with other exhausters, which require steam engines and all the auxiliary mechanism for the transmission of power. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 508, September 26, 1885, by Various