exceedingly mangled

18 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Those amongst them that are yet alive have been exceedingly mangled! Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Ye also are tired and I myself am exceedingly mangled! Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Saying these words and filled with joy, the Srinjayas pursued thy troops in that battle who had been exceedingly mangled with shafts. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Thou hadst first been engaged with Ashvatthama and exceedingly mangled by him. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Already pierced by Drona's son with shafts, all their limbs have been exceedingly mangled. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2
  • At this time Duryodhana beheld, staying at a little distance from him, his troops, exceedingly mangled with shafts, and prepared to fly away. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • After I had come about two miles, O monarch, I beheld Duryodhana, standing alone, mace in hand, and exceedingly mangled. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Incapable of being endured by others and marked by a river whose distasteful water consisted of blood, the limbs of those two heroes, as also their drivers and animals, became exceedingly mangled. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Encountered in battle, doth that wretch lie today on the field, his limbs exceedingly mangled with sky-ranging shafts sped by thee from thy bow and all steeped in blood? Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • It is not proper that one should in battle fight many endued with courage, especially when that one is without armour, fatigued, afflicted with calamity, exceedingly mangled in his limbs, and destitute of both animals and troops! Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • It is not proper, that one hero should fight with many at the same time, especially when that single warrior is divested of armour, fatigued with exertion, covered with water, exceedingly mangled in limbs, and without cars, animals and troops! Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Avoiding then the shafts sped from Karna's bow, that best of men, Shikhandi, exceedingly mangled, retreated speedily from that spot. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Afflicted by Shalya the Pandavas, exceedingly mangled, fled away, leaving the battle, and disregarding the cries of Yudhishthira commanding them to stop. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Indeed, with those lifeless heads with upturned eyes, that were exceedingly mangled (with shafts and other weapons), the field of battle, O king, looked resplendent as if strewn with full blown lotuses. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • With his twin brothers accompanying him, that ruler of men, quickly repairing in shame to the (Pandava) camp, his body exceedingly mangled with shafts, alighted from the car and hastily sat down on an excellent bed. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Some tracts are covered with fallen elephants huge as mountains, exceedingly mangled, their vital limbs pierced with shafts, lying helplessly, deprived of life, their armour displaced and the weapons, the shields and the swords with which they were equipped lying scattered about. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • Salwa, however, suddenly checking that foremost of elephants which had been exceedingly mangled and forced to retreat, caused it to turn back, and with hooks and keen lances urged it forward against the car of the Pancala king, pointing it out to the infuriate animal. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3
  • The mighty car-warrior Ashvatthama, however, though struggling vigorously, could not, O chief of the Bharatas, slay the carless and steedless and bowless Dhrishtadyumna, although pierced and exceedingly mangled with many arrows. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3