essential amino

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  • Other sources claim its protein is not complete but relatively high in essential amino acids.
  • Essential amino acids cannot be made by the body, and must be supplied by food.
  • Proteins known as complete proteins contain all eight of the essential amino acids.
  • It is a non-essential amino acid with a polar side group.
  • Any of these may be sources of essential amino acids.
  • It is not an essential amino acid, which means that the human body can synthesize it.
  • Rare for a plant, it contains all essential amino acids.
  • Members of the animal kingdom do not possess this pathway and must therefore acquire these essential amino acids through their diet.
  • Plant protein is often described as incomplete, suggesting that they lack one or more of the essential amino acids.
  • Mammals do not have this pathway, meaning that they must obtain these essential amino acids through their diet.
  • Apart from rare examples, such as Taro, each plant provides an amount of all the essential amino acids.
  • Like other legumes, its protein is rich in the essential amino acid lysine.
  • Plantains, another major staple, are also a poor source of essential amino acids.
  • There are nine essential amino acids which humans must obtain from their diet in order to prevent protein-energy malnutrition.
  • Eru is a good source of protein and is strong in essential and non-essential amino acids.
  • Essential amino acids may also differ between species.
  • The needs for protein and essential amino acids are more than adequately satisfied.
  • Phenylalanine is one of the essential amino acids and is required for normal growth and maintenance of life.
  • These are the essential amino acids, since it is essential to ingest them.
  • It is a semi-essential amino acid, which means that it can be biosynthesized in humans.
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