Erectheus

All Noun
24 examples (0.01 sec)
  • Erectheus for instance was the God of the sea, and as such worshipped by the very people who enlisted him among their kings. Cited from Analysis of Antient Mythology, Volume II (of VI), by Jacob Bryant
  • What connection is there between Erectheus, the jays and the dog? Cited from The Eleven Comedies: Volume 1, Aristophanes
  • Creusa, daughter of Erectheus King of Athens, is married to Xuthus but has no issue. Cited from Authors of Greece, by T. W. Lumb
  • But I myself will go to the land of Erectheus, to dwell with AEgeus son of Pandion. Cited from The Tragedies of Euripides, Volume I, by Euripides
  • Early Greek texts do not distinguish between him and Erectheus, his grandson, but by the fourth century BC, during Classical times, they are distinct figures.
  • Nor to his eager sire fair token of happy returning 210 Rais'd, when his eyes safe-sighted Erectheus' populous haven. Cited from The Poems and Fragments of Catullus, by Catullus
  • In the battle Oeagrus, Aeacus, and Erectheus all distinguish themselves.
  • The first was carried off by Aurora, and went to live with her in Syria; the second married Procris, the daughter of Erectheus, king of Athens. Cited from The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol. I, Books I-VII,by Publius Ovidius Naso
  • Creusa introduces herself to Ion as the daughter of Erectheus and Ion is impressed.
  • Eumolpus being the Hierophant, or explainer of the mysteries of Eleusis, made war against Erectheus, king of Athens. Cited from The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol. I, Books I-VII,by Publius Ovidius Naso
  • When the unhappy daughter of Erectheus left her infant in this cave to perish, she wept as she departed; and Phoebus, her immortal lover, changed her tears to rills. Cited from Philothea, by Lydia Maria Child
  • Boreas, not obtaining the consent of Erectheus, king of Athens, for the marriage of his daughter, Orithyia, takes that princess in his arms, and carries her away into Thrace. Cited from The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol. I, Books I-VII,by Publius Ovidius Naso
  • We learn from a fragment of Stobaeus, that Erectheus, when engaged in a war against the Eleusinians, was told by the oracle that he would be victorious, if he sacrificed his daughter Proserpine. Cited from The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol. I, Books I-VII,by Publius Ovidius Naso
  • O most dear to me of deities, daughter of Latona, thou that assortest with me, huntest with me, we shall then indeed be banished illustrious Athens: but farewell O city, and land of Erectheus. Cited from The Tragedies of Euripides, Volume I, by Euripides
  • They were both killed in battle, and it was thereupon agreed that the posterity of Erectheus should be kings of Athens, and the descendants of Eumolpus should, in future, retain the office of Hierophant. Cited from The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol. I, Books I-VII,by Publius Ovidius Naso
  • Yet if the dweller on holy Itone, who deigns defend our race and Erectheus' dwellings, grant thee to besprinkle thy right hand in the bull's blood, then see that in very truth these commandments deep-stored in thine heart's memory do flourish, nor any time deface them. Cited from The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus, by Caius Valerius Catullus
  • But Theseus, self-blinded with mental mist, let slip from forgetful breast all those injunctions which until then he had held firmly in mind, nor bore aloft sweet signals to his sad sire, shewing himself safe when in sight of Erectheus' haven. Cited from The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus, by Caius Valerius Catullus
  • Erectheus succeeds him, whose daughter, Orithyia, is ravished by Boreas, and by him is the mother of Calais and Zethes, who are of the number of the Argonauts on the following occasion. Cited from The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol. I, Books I-VII,by Publius Ovidius Naso
  • Cephalus is said to have lived in the time of Cecrops [Greek: autochthon]: or, as some say, in the time of Erectheus; many centuries before Antilochus and Achilles, who were at the siege of Troy. Cited from Analysis of Antient Mythology, Volume II (of VI), by Jacob Bryant
  • It may be, ere my crafty father's line Sprang from Erectheus, some artificer, Who found you roaming wingless on the hills, Naked, asserting godship in the dearth Of loftier claimants, fashioned you the same. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 6, No. 36, October, 1860, by Various
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