enlarge the circle

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It will also be necessary for us to enlarge the circle and reach the people in our own places of business. Cited from The Personal Touch, by J. Wilbur Chapman
  • Its mission is first to fix attention, and then to enlarge the circle of acquired knowledge. Cited from Sophisms of the Protectionists, by Frederic Bastiat
  • Men enjoyed him in these moods; and as he raised his voice, so he enlarged the circle of his audience. Cited from The Card, A Story Of Adventure In The Five Towns, by Arnold Bennett
  • In this way he enlarged the circle of his intimacy, which now embraced several names of notoriety. Cited from Oliver Goldsmith, by Washington Irving
  • Kleuker enlarged the circle of comparison to the whole of ancient literature. Cited from Sacred Books of the East, Ed. by Epiphanius Wilson [Tr.: F. Max Mueller]
  • Even during the last two or three years of her life, when her works were rising in the estimation of the public, they did not enlarge the circle of her acquaintance. Cited from Memoir of Jane Austen, by James Edward Austen-Leigh
  • The natural development of his position under the influence of Lady Marayne had enormously enlarged the circle of his acquaintances. Cited from The Research Magnificent, by H.G. Wells
  • The brain will not only grow more effectively powerful in the departments of life where the brain is supposed specially to work, but it will also enlarge the circle of its activities. Cited from The Human Machine, by E. Arnold Bennett
  • Mehemet Ali's chief ambition had always been to enlarge the circle of regeneration in the East. Cited from History Of Egypt From 330 B.C., Volume 12 (of 12), by S. Rappoport
  • Meanwhile, the insurgents omitted nothing which might enlarge the circle of disaffection. Cited from The Life of George Washington, Vol. 5 (of 5), by John Marshall
  • We pour out wine to those about us, wishing the same fellowship and conviviality to others: but to enlarge the circle would disturb and deaden its harmony. Cited from Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 329, March 1843, Vol. 53
  • It is to be regretted that he did not know the philosophic works of Saadia, who would have opened up new worlds to him, and would have enlarged the circle of his ideas. Cited from Rashi, by Maurice Liber
  • His object in all the earlier military operations of the siege was simply to enlarge the circle of investment, in the hope of thereby placing the Germans in a difficulty, of which he might subsequently take advantage. Cited from My Days of Adventure, by Ernest Alfred Vizetelly
  • Let every individual friend resolve that he will, if possible, increase his contribution over that of last year, and that in any event he will by personal effort enlarge the circle of our supporters by inducing some friend or friends to take an interest in our work. Cited from The American Missionary, Vol. 42, No. 1, January 1888, by Various
  • The troops and the civil authorities then renewed their oath to the constitution, and Lafayette endeavoured to enlarge the circle of the insurrection of the army against the popular insurrection. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Where were to be lodged all the gentry of the neighborhood, who would gather in two or three hours after the news had enlarged the circle of its report, like the increasing circumference produced by a stone thrown into a placid lake? Cited from Ten Years Later, by Alexandre Dumas
  • Where were to be lodged all the gentry of the neighborhood, who would gather in two or three hours after the news had enlarged the circle of its report, like the increasing circumferences produced by a stone thrown into a placid lake? Cited from The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
  • During the nine months spent in Paris, from September 1851 to June 1852, Browning enlarged the circle of his friends and made some new and interesting acquaintances. Cited from Robert Browning, by Edward Dowden
  • In a contrary event, their names must be transmitted to posterity as the victims to a laudable desire to enlarge the circle of human knowledge, and with it, we trust, to increase the glory due to God. Cited from The Sea Lions, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • If it were not liable to ridicule, I would say that an acquaintance with the language of beasts would be a most agreeable acquisition to man, as it would enlarge the circle of his social intercourse. Cited from Boswell's Correspondence with Erskine ... Tour to Corsica, by Boswell