Englishry

All Noun
35 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Info Englishry, or Englescherie, is a legal name given, in medieval England, for the status of a person as an Englishman, i.e. as a commoner of of native Anglo-Saxon stock rather than a member of the Anglo-Norman elite. more...
  • To put a stop to these crimes, William enacted the Law of Englishry. Cited from The Leading Facts of English History, by D.H. Montgomery
  • While there remained any doubt about the issue of the conflict between the Englishry and the Irishry, he had stood aloof. Cited from History of England, James II V. 4, Macaulay
  • On a close scrutiny it would have been found that neither the Irishry nor the Englishry formed a perfectly homogeneous body. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 2, Macaulay
  • Laugharne is at the eastern end of the south Wales Englishry and only a minority of its inhabitants have ever spoken Welsh.
  • But the war cry of the Irishry had scarcely died away when the first faint murmurs of the Englishry began to be heard. Cited from History of England, James II V. 4, Macaulay
  • A rumour spread over the whole island that, on the ninth of December, there would be a general massacre of the Englishry. Cited from History of England, James II V. 3, Macaulay
  • The fugitive Englishry found in England warm sympathy and munificent relief. Cited from History of England, James II V. 3, Macaulay
  • Two new war cries, Protestant and Catholic, animated the old feud between the Englishry and the Irishry. Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V4 of 4
  • Of this grew the presentment of Englishry, one of the few formal badges of distinction between the conquering and the conquered race. Cited from William the Conqueror, by E.A. Freeman
  • It was comprised in one word, which, as Clarendon tells us, was often in the mouths of the Englishry of that time. Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V4 of 4
  • He was Master of the Ordnance in that kingdom, and was colonel of a regiment in which an uncommonly large proportion of the Englishry had been suffered to remain. Cited from History of England, James II V. 3, Macaulay
  • The terms Englishry and Welshry are used similarly about Gower.
  • Anglo-Saxon identity survived beyond the Norman Conquest, and came to be known as Englishry under Norman rule and ultimately developed into the modern English people.
  • The greatest of them is now little more than a name; he is criticised to be underrated and not to be understood; but he presented all that alternative and more liberal Englishry; and was enormously popular because he presented it. Cited from The Crimes of England, by G.K. Chesterton
  • The bare unblinking truth hereon is this: The Englishry are a pursuing army, And we a flying brothel! Cited from The Dynasts, by Thomas Hardy
  • Though four fifths of the population of Ireland were Celtic and Roman Catholic, more than four fifths of the property of Ireland belonged to the Protestant Englishry. Cited from History of England, James II V. 3, Macaulay
  • One of the most learned and diligent Irish archeologists of our time has laboured, not indeed very successfully, to prove that the event of the day was decided by a mere accident from which the Englishry could derive no glory. Cited from History of England, James II V. 3, Macaulay
  • The Englishry remained victorious, and it was necessary for Pitt, as it had been necessary for Oliver Cromwell and William of Orange before him, to consider how the victory should be used. Cited from Misc Writings and Speeches, Lord Macaulay V3 of 4
  • These documents, like the tower itself, take us back to the early days when Dublin was the stronghold of the Englishry in Ireland, and its citizens went in constant peril of an attack from the wild and "mere Irish" in the hills. Cited from Ireland Under Coercion (2nd ed.) (1 of 2) (1888), William Henry Hurlbert
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