Englishcombe

All Noun
13 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Info Englishcombe is a village and civil parish in Bath and North East Somerset just outside Bath, England. more...
  • The only curtsey I had dropped to me in this district was from an old woman in the small hill-hidden village of Englishcombe. Cited from A Traveller in Little Things, by W. H. Hudson
  • The parish of Englishcombe was part of the Wellow Hundred.
  • Culverhay Castle was built in a ringwork design in the village of Englishcombe, Somerset.
  • Culverhay Castle, also known as Englishcombe Castle, was a castle in the village of Englishcombe, Somerset, England.
  • Inglesbatch is a small village within the civil parish of Englishcombe in the Bath and North East Somerset district of Somerset, England.
  • In 1530 there is reference to the village having its own manor, but by 1611 it appears to have been subsumed into the lands of Englishcombe Manor.
  • The parish is with the benefice of Bath St Barnabas with Englishcombe.
  • The music video featured 100 cast members including dancers and local children from the village of Englishcombe in Bath, UK where it was filmed at the 14th century Tithe barn.
  • Together with the adjacent Manor of Inglescombe (Englishcombe) that the Duchy already owned, this created the Duchy's largest estate outside Dartmoor.
  • The earthwork remains of the Gournay family castle, just north of the village of Englishcombe known as Culverhay Castle was built in the 12th century and is now a Scheduled Ancient Monument.
  • The little conical hill of Englishcombe, where the unfortunate Duke of Monmouth drew up his army during his rash and fatal enterprise, awoke a thousand recollections, whilst the lovely river flashed occasionally in the noontide sun. Cited from Recollections of the late William Beckford, by Henry Venn Lansdown
  • The Domesday Book of 1086 records that Twerton was held by Nigel de Gournay, who would have won his lands in Englishcombe, Twerton, Swainswick and Barrow Gurney by fighting for William I of England.
  • The Domesday Book of 1086 records that Englishcombe was held by Nigel de Gournay, who would have won his lands in Englishcombe, Twerton, Swainswick and Barrow Gurney by fighting for William I of England.