empirically oriented

13 examples (0.03 sec)
  • He made his case in a series of papers, most of them empirically oriented.
  • The middle-range approach has played a key role in turning sociology into an increasingly empirically-oriented discipline.
  • According to one of his colleagues, his work was not without theological preferences and bias, but he presented himself as an empirically oriented psychologist.
  • It is easy for empirically oriented academics to underestimate the importance and value of managerial intuition, especially when this is based on experience.
  • Anthropologists embraced the substantivist position as empirically oriented as it did not impose western cultural assumptions on other societies where they might not be warranted.
  • Anthropologists embraced the substantivist position as empirically oriented, as it did not impose western cultural assumptions on other societies where they might not be warranted.
  • He moved to the United States in 1967, in part, because of problems faced by empirically oriented philosophers in obtaining academic positions in Austria and Germany.
  • Empirically-oriented psychologists have identified and investigated four cardinal self-evaluation motives (or self-motives) relevant to the development, maintenance, and modification of self-views.
  • While some of the critical approaches also gained popularity in the United States, the mainstream of the discipline has instead shifted to a myriad of empirically-oriented middle-range theories with no overarching theoretical orientation.
  • Wedervang belonged firmly to the school of empirically oriented Norwegian economists in the tradition of Anton Martin Schweigaard.
  • Kant thus distinguishes between rationally-oriented (ontotheological) and empirically-oriented (cosmotheological) discussion.
  • More empirically oriented research was subsequently conducted by Williams H. R. Rivers (1864-1922) who attempted to measure the intelligence and sensory acuity of indigenous people residing in the Torres Straits area, located between Australia and New Guinea.
  • Legal realism emerged as an anti-formalist and empirically oriented response to and rejection of the legal formalism of Dean Christopher Columbus Langdell and the American Law Institute (ALI), as well as of the "mechanical jurisprudence" or "science of law" with which both became associated.