Elizabeth Gaunt

14 examples (0.02 sec)
  • He delivered himself up to the government; and he gave information against Fernley and Elizabeth Gaunt. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 1, Macaulay
  • I cried, starting to my feet as he put his hand across the deal table to mine; and then the door opened and Elizabeth Gaunt came in. Cited from The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911, by Various
  • In spite of all my confusion and distress, I uttered no word that could be used against Elizabeth Gaunt. Cited from The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911, by Various
  • He was saved from death by an ancient matron of the Baptist persuasion, named Elizabeth Gaunt. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 1, Macaulay
  • Elizabeth Gaunt was burned alive at Tyburn on the same day on which Cornish suffered death in Cheapside. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 1, Macaulay
  • The men had come for Elizabeth Gaunt herself, and they told her, in my hearing, that she was accused of having given shelter to one of Monmouth's men, and the punishment of this crime was death. Cited from The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911, by Various
  • It did not seem to me at first possible that such a woman as Elizabeth Gaunt, that had never concerned herself with plots or politics, but spent her life wholly in good works, should be taken up as a public enemy and so treated only because she had given shelter to a man that had fled for his life. Cited from The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911, by Various
  • When the time came that he must give his evidence, the villain stepped forward with a swaggering impudence that ill-concealed his secret shame, and swore not only that Elizabeth Gaunt had given him shelter, but moreover that she had done it knowing who he was and where he came from. Cited from The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911, by Various
  • Fernley was sentenced to the gallows, Elizabeth Gaunt to the stake. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 1, Macaulay
  • Had it been a year later, we might have guessed it to have referred to the sufferings of that pious, excellent woman, Elizabeth Gaunt, who was burnt, October 23, 1685. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volumes 1-3, John Bunyan
  • William Penn, for whom exhibitions which humane men generally avoid seem to have had a strong attraction, hastened from Cheapside, where he had seen Cornish hanged, to Tyburn, in order to see Elizabeth Gaunt burned. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 1, Macaulay
  • There is a possibility that Jeffreys may have been an ardent lover of liberty, and that he may have beheaded Algernon Sydney, and burned Elizabeth Gaunt, only in order to produce a reaction which might lead to the limitation of the prerogative. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V2
  • Some have been so absurd as to cite this imaginary pardon, which, if it were real would prove only that Ferguson was a court spy, in proof of the magnanimity and benignity of the prince who beheaded Alice Lisle and burned Elizabeth Gaunt. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 1, Macaulay
  • On the same day on which Cornish was executed, Jeffreys also had the satisfaction of knowing that Elizabeth Gaunt was burned alive at Tyburn, London, for having assisted one of the Rye-House conspirators, who had fought for Monmouth at Sedgemoor, to escape. Cited from The Leading Facts of English History, by D.H. Montgomery