ecclesiastical censure

40 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Some were received without much controversy; others came under the shadow of ecclesiastical censure.
  • The process is a form of ecclesiastical censure that states the person is not to be listened to by the community.
  • Fighting against what he perceived to be the liberalization of Catholic doctrine, he came under ecclesiastical censure.
  • For a time he was under ecclesiastical censure.
  • The bishop usually extends to them greater powers than are commonly given for reconciling sinners who have incurred ecclesiastical censures. Cited from Life of Father Hecker, by Walter Elliott
  • There was hardly a prelate or royal chaplain in England who was not under ecclesiastical censure. Cited from Beacon Lights of History, Volume V, by John Lord
  • Everything bordering on witchcraft, devil worship, or such like, met with ecclesiastical censure. Cited from The Mysteries of All Nations, by James Grant
  • Their frequent use and abuse brought ecclesiastical censures into public contempt, and princes soon ceased to be frightened with false fires. Cited from Henry VIII, by A. F. Pollard
  • The idea of a complete catalogue of heretical and dangerous writings under ecclesiastical censure took its rise in the Netherlands. Cited from The Age of the Reformation, by Preserved Smith
  • While the latter attacked him and sought ecclesiastical censure, he recommended himself to the former by his criticism of the worldly possessions of the clergy.
  • It is safest to let their faith rest undisturbed, and that they be not taught to despise ecclesiastical censures. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 8, No. 48, October, 1861, by Various
  • But the said minister regarded the ecclesiastical censures and his prelate as of so little moment, that his subsequent action was just as if he had not been excommunicated and denounced. Cited from The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Vol. 21, Ed. by Blair & Robertson
  • In the course of forty years after the payment of tithes had been forced by ecclesiastical censures and excommunications, prescription was set up. Cited from A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume III (of 3), by Thomas Clarkson
  • Christians too, if need be, shall be compelled by ecclesiastical censure, without the possibility of an appeal, to abstain from commerce with them.
  • Cherem is the highest ecclesiastical censure in the Jewish community.
  • It no longer attempted to establish universal peace; it satisfied itself with forbidding, under the strongest ecclesiastical censures, all private war and violence of any kind on certain days of the week. Cited from William the Conqueror, by E.A. Freeman
  • He even decided, about 1537, to return to the obedience of the Observants, through fear of incurring some ecclesiastical censure.
  • Attempt to subject him to ecclesiastical censure, 127. Cited from Life of Adam Smith, by John Rae
  • The main subject of discussion was the sufficiency of the Thirty Articles, and the propriety of the ecclesiastical censure promulgated against those who had signed them. Cited from A Popular History of Ireland, by T.D. McGee
  • Through this sacred conventionalism Vesalius broke without fear; despite ecclesiastical censure, great opposition in his own profession, and popular fury, he studied his science by the only method that could give useful results. Cited from Warfare of Science/Theology, Andrew Dickson White
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