doctrine of consideration

16 examples (0.04 sec)
  • This is result is reached, with some complexity, through the English doctrine of consideration.
  • The second stage was when the doctrine of consideration was introduced in its earlier form of a benefit to the promisor. Cited from The Common Law, by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
  • The other diversity marked the entrance of the doctrine of consideration into the law of bailment. Cited from The Common Law, by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
  • This result is reached, with some complexity, through a peculiarity of English law called the doctrine of consideration.
  • In reality the doctrine of consideration operates in a very small scope, and creates few difficulties in commercial practice.
  • Debt throws most light upon the doctrine of consideration. Cited from The Common Law, by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
  • Without having ever finally committed himself to a definite scheme of tariff reform, he preached everywhere the doctrine of consideration. Cited from A Lost Leader, by E. Phillips Oppenheim
  • His proposals include, inter alia, the abandonment of the English doctrine of consideration.
  • In it, Lord Mansfield tentatively expressed a view that the doctrine of consideration was redundant.
  • Lord Mansfield held that the doctrine of consideration should not be applied to preclude enforcement of promises made in mercantile transactions.
  • This is because, in English law, there is a doctrine of consideration which requires that both parties must be under an obligation to give something of value, before either will be legally bound to an obligation.
  • In the English speaking world, this notion has not survived as well as in civil law jurisdictions, for the doctrine of consideration has essentially covered the requirement of essential terms in basic bargains.
  • With the courts' hostility to restraints on trade, the doctrine of consideration was forming, that to enforce any obligation something of value needed to be conveyed.
  • And with the courts' hostility to restraints on trade, a doctrine of consideration was forming, so that to enforce any obligation something of value needed to be conveyed.
  • The doctrine of estoppel has been mooted by academics as a good model, but judges have refused to let it be a sidestep of the doctrine of consideration, saying estoppel must be a shield not a sword, and calling instead for Parliamentary intervention.
  • Pillans & Rose v Van Mierop & Hopkins (1765) 3 Burr 1663 is a case concerning letters of credit, and the doctrine of consideration.