detective

All Noun Adjective
27,129 examples (0.07 sec)
  • The detectives told him to contact them in case he ever saw the man again.
  • It features a group of detectives who set out to fight a crime family.
  • Detectives may use public and private records to provide background information on a subject.
  • He said it was the beginning of a successful detective's career. Cited from The Outdoor Girls at Ocean View, by Laura Lee Hope
  • He took one look at them and thrust them into the detective's hands. Cited from The Orange-Yellow Diamond, by J. S. Fletcher
  • Not long afterward he himself tried his hand at creating a detective story along these lines.
  • He thrust his arm through the detective's and led him across the street. Cited from The Illustrious Prince, by E. Phillips Oppenheim 3
  • It is widely known for both its detective fiction and war stories.
  • Since then, the private detective industry has grown with the changing needs of the public.
  • These would often be the detective's own private car.
  • Many detective stories have police officers as the main characters.
  • Two store detectives ask them to return to the manager's office.
  • The character is notable as being one of the first female private detectives in popular fiction.
  • The detective's clothes were too new and his companion's too old. Cited from The Illustrious Prince, by E. Phillips Oppenheim 3
  • But the detective's blood was up, and he would listen to no one. Cited from Dyke Darrel, by Frank Pinkerton
  • Many detectives appear in more than one novel or story.
  • Then back to the past, where we explain the circumstances of the detective's death.
  • A detective's not much good outside the covers of a book. Cited from The Four Pools Mystery, by Jean Webster
  • He became one of the most prominent detectives of the times.
  • It is equally true of some recent detective novels set in Roman times.
  • Next »

Words starting with detective

Meaning of detective

  • noun A police officer who investigates crimes
  • noun An investigator engaged or employed in obtaining information not easily available to the public