dear Miss Howe

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • I will suppose, my dear Miss Howe, that you have read my cousin's letter. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 4 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • Call her, at every word, your dear Miss Howe. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 6 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • You are very obliging, my dear Miss Howe, to account to me for your silence. Cited from Clarissa, Vol. 8 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • Help me, dear Miss Howe, to a little of your charming spirit: I never more wanted it. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 1 of 9, by Samuel Richardson
  • I write this, my dear Miss Howe, only for a feint, and to see if it will go current. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 5 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • She said, I must not blame her parents: it was her dear Miss Howe's fault to do so. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 7, by Samuel Richardson
  • I hope, my dear Miss Howe, I shall not have occasion, in my future letters, to contradict these promising appearances. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9),by Samuel Richardson
  • We are so much observed -- else on my knees, my dear Miss Howe, would I beg your interest with your charming friend. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 7, by Samuel Richardson
  • I am extremely concerned, my dear Miss Howe, for being primarily the occasion of the apprehensions you have of this wicked man's vindictive attempts. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 7, by Samuel Richardson
  • I think myself obliged to thank you, my dear Miss Howe, for your condescension, in taking notice of a creature who has occasioned you so much scandal. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9),by Samuel Richardson
  • Dear Miss Howe, mingle not passion with denunciations so severe. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 7, by Samuel Richardson
  • Miss Howe, my dear Miss Howe, is but too sensible of the effects of my fault, having had more words with her mother on my account, than ever she had on any other. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9),by Samuel Richardson
  • Thus, my dear Miss Howe, has my brother got me into his snares; and I, like a poor silly bird, the more I struggle, am the more entangled. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 1 of 9, by Samuel Richardson
  • There will be endeavours used to confine me, and keep me out of your presence, and out of the presence of every one who used to love me [this, my dear Miss Howe, is threatened]. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 1 of 9, by Samuel Richardson
  • To produce one instance only of the truth of this observation; what would I have given for weeks past, for the favour of a letter from my dear Miss Howe, in whose friendship I placed all my remaining comfort! Cited from Clarissa, Volume 6 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • I will give you my reasons for declining it; and so I ought, when both my love and my gratitude would make a visit now-and-then from my dear Miss Howe the most consolate thing in the world to me. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 7, by Samuel Richardson
  • So here, my dear Miss Howe, am I deprived of the advice of one of the most prudent and conscientious women in the world, were I to have ever so much occasion for it. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 1 of 9, by Samuel Richardson
  • Yet, considering my fault in their eyes, and the provocations I am to suppose they so newly had from my dear Miss Howe, I am to look upon it as a favour that it was answered at all. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 7, by Samuel Richardson
  • Come, my dear Miss Howe, since you press me to be beholden to you: and would think me proud if I absolutely refused your favour; pray be so good as to send her two guineas in my name. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9),by Samuel Richardson
  • It was only to know, and that for a very particular reason, as well as for affection unbounded, if my dear Miss Howe, from whom I had not heard of a long time, were ill; as I had been told she was; and if so, how she now does. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 6 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • Next »

How dear Miss Howe gets used