crude beginnings

21 examples (0.03 sec)
  • From these crude beginnings I worked my way down toward the present day. Cited from One Third Off, by Irvin S. Cobb
  • Indian society grew up in the most natural way out of the crude beginnings of all society. Cited from French Pathfinders in North America, by William Henry Johnson
  • And these crude beginnings here have only to be put in their place, to command from the critic, at least, a similar respect. Cited from Plays of Shakspere Unfolded, by Delia Bacon
  • Such were no doubt the crude beginnings of human morality. Cited from The Destiny of Man, by John Fiske
  • Whatever people do, they want to be doing something else, and the pathway of the average individual is strewn with crude beginnings, half-finished jobs, abandoned work. Cited from Vocational Guidance for Girls, by Marguerite Stockman Dickson
  • So the development of man's religious ideas from early, crude beginnings until now is not a process which one would wish to stop at any point in order to achieve infallible security. Cited from Christianity and Progress, by Harry Emerson Fosdick
  • The general reader will find the book less interesting than the specialist, since a large portion of the volume is devoted to the somewhat crude beginnings of humor in our literature. Cited from The Best Short Stories of 1920, by Various
  • From crude beginnings, the hand loom of our grandmothers' time developed. Cited from Textiles and Clothing, by Kate Heintz Watson
  • Upward and onward, or down into the purlieus of the crude beginnings of things. Cited from Insights and Heresies Pertaining to the Evolution of the Soul, Scofield
  • Somewhere along the way it has to decide its own fate, upward and onward, or downward into the purlieus of the crude beginnings of things. Cited from Insights and Heresies Pertaining to the Evolution of the Soul, Scofield
  • This need not concern us if we make sure that the crude beginnings of the God-idea have no disturbing elements in them, and that as the concept grows it moves in the right direction. Cited from How to Teach Religion, by George Herbert Betts
  • I saw in the ragged scaffolding and the big ugly crane swinging from its place in the sky the symbol of our crude beginnings -- our ragged past. Cited from The Victim, by Thomas Dixon
  • It has altered the destiny of this nation, and other nations, made greatness out of crude beginnings, wealth out of poverty, prosperity upon thousands of square miles of uninhabitable wilderness. Cited from Steam Steel and Electricity, by James W. Steele
  • The crude beginnings of scores of pomological novelties are flaunted on every side. Cited from The Confessions of a Beachcomber, by E J Banfield
  • Surely we are not to take natural selection as the sole factor of ethical import because we see it at the crude beginnings of life on this earth, while the process of life itself in its higher ranges passes beyond natural selection. Cited from Recent Tendencies in Ethics, by William Ritchie Sorley
  • Granting the hypothesis of evolution, there can be no quarrel with the view that the crude beginnings of things, matter in its most nebulous state, contains potentially all the rich variety of both natural and spiritual life. Cited from Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher, by Henry Jones
  • There is still a great difference of opinion as to how man's spiritual nature came into being; still discussion as to whether it developed out of crude beginnings as the rest of his physical and mental endowment has developed, or whether it was added from the outside as something entirely new. Cited from Outwitting Our Nerves, by Josephine A. Jackson and Helen M. Salisbury
  • And when Creation's early work was done, What crude beginnings out of chaos came - A formless nebula, a wavering flame, An errant comet, a voracious sun. Cited from Poems of Progress, by Ella W. Wilcox
  • The wattle-work hut with its roof of interlaced boughs, the skins sewn by fine needles with entrails or sinews, the matted twigs, grasses, and rushes are all the crude beginnings of an art which tells of the settled life of to-day. Cited from Textiles and Clothing, by Kate Heintz Watson
  • He had followed the crude beginnings of aerial navigation very keenly in his previous life; he was delighted to find the familiar names of Maxim and Pilcher, Langley and Chanute, and, above all, of the aerial proto-martyr Lillienthal, still honoured by men. Cited from When the Sleeper Wakes, by H.G. Wells