cowl unit

20 examples (0.01 sec)
  • These tend to be cowl units, in which the body is not load-bearing.
  • In recent years, locomotive manufacturers have switched from cab units to cowl units when a full-width body is desired.
  • A cowl unit is a body style of diesel locomotive.
  • The cowl unit allows the basic structure of the locomotive to be identical to a freight-oriented hood unit type.
  • Most cowl units have been passenger-hauling locomotives.
  • The main disadvantage of the cowl unit is low rear visibility from the cab of the locomotive.
  • It was the same design as the F45 and FP45 cowl units being built by EMD at the time.
  • The locomotive body was a cowl unit design, consisting of structural longitudinal members, with cross stretchers forming the supports for the internal equipment including the engine-generator.
  • The engines were CP's only cowl units, and have been nicknamed "red barns" by railfans.
  • It was fundamentally an SD40-2 in a cowl unit full-width body.
  • Desiring smooth-sided passenger power, the railroad ordered the first cowl units from both GE and GM-EMD.
  • Since all the structural support on a cowl unit is in the frame of the locomotive, rather than the body, manufacturers can easily create full-width locomotives from hood unit designs by building cowl units.
  • Since all the structural support on a cowl unit is in the frame of the locomotive, rather than the body, manufacturers can easily create full-width locomotives from hood unit designs by building cowl units.
  • The DDA40X used the wide-nosed cab from the FP45 cowl units.
  • Unlike PH237ACmi the locomotives are expected to be built to a cowl unit external design, with dimensions of long, width, and height, The locomotives retain a twin cab design.
  • In this service, the cowl unit's full width bodywork and sleek sides match the passenger cars, do not allow unwanted riders, and allow the decorative, advertising paintwork desired by passenger operators.
  • A cowl unit is one with full-width enclosing bodywork, similar to the cab unit style of earlier locomotives, but unlike the cab unit style, the bodywork is merely a casing and is not load-bearing.
  • The cab, or crew or driver's compartment of a diesel or electric locomotive will usually be found either inside a cabin attached to a hood unit or cowl unit locomotive, or forming one of the structural elements of a cab unit locomotive.
  • Cowl units were originally produced at the request of the Santa Fe, had a full-width 'cowl' body built on a hood unit frame which provided all the structural strength; the bodywork was cosmetic, rather than a load-bearing bridge truss frame as in cab units.
  • Further Santa Fe passenger locomotives were custom-ordered cowl units from both GE (the U30CG) and GM-EMD (the FP45).