cowl flaps

19 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The official government investigation concluded that the engine cut out because it became too cold in the absence of the cowl flaps.
  • The bureau also noted that while it is possible for cowl flaps to separate from aircraft in flight, this had not happened with any recent aircraft.
  • The official government investigation concluded that the engine stalled because it became too cold in the absence of the cowl flaps.
  • The cause was traced to the design of the engine cowl flaps which controlled air flow over the cylinders.
  • At the same time the cowl flaps, which controlled airflow through and around the troublesome engines, were being modified.
  • Modifications had to be made to the engines and also to the cowl flaps.
  • When the aircraft took off and the wing flaps were retracted, the loss of lift caused by the open engine cowl flaps caused the aircraft wings to partially stall.
  • The open cowl flaps could also disrupt the flow of air over the wings and it was therefore necessary to close them during critical phases of flight such as takeoff when maximum lift was needed.
  • The engines featured a sliding cowl arrangement to facilitate cooling airflow instead of the normal cowl flaps, which caused too much drag.
  • Belly-mounted cowl flaps are still used, but less cooling airflow is directed over the cylinder barrels and more cooling airflow is directed into side-mounted oil coolers.
  • This necessitated the use of cowl flaps for the first time on the Viking but resulted in a 12 mph increase.
  • Roof flaps, power steering, generation 5 NASCAR chassis, cowl flaps, are a few.
  • Tests performed by CAB investigators showed that a Stratocruiser that took off with all cowl flaps open would respond very similarly to a Stratocruiser with one engine shut down and could be turned and flown for some time before becoming too unstable to remain in the air.
  • The cowling was redesigned to enlarge the cowl flaps, revise the oil cooler air intake, and move the carburetor air intake to the upper half of the cowling.
  • All of the engine controls (throttle, mixture, propeller pitch, radiator and cowl flaps, and supercharger gearbox) had separate levers which served to distract the pilot during combat to make constant adjustments or risk suboptimal performance.
  • During landing approaches it was found that oil from the hydraulic cowl flaps could spatter onto the windscreen, badly reducing visibility, and the undercarriage oleo struts had bad rebound characteristics on landing, allowing the aircraft to bounce out of control down the carrier deck.
  • Research by Mr. Bunzo Komine published by Mr. Kenji Miyazaki states that aircraft 3904 through 4103 had the same exhaust system and cowl flaps as on the Model 22.
  • The 260C introduced a new "Tiger Shark" cowling, max gross weight of 3200 pounds, cowl flaps, and an aileron-rudder interconnect.
  • The piston engine tended to overheat until electrically operated cowl flaps were installed, the catapult hooks had to be moved and the nosewheel oleo shock strut had to be lengthened by, Carrier suitability tests began aboard the escort carrier in early January 1945.