Counsellours

All Noun
14 examples (0.01 sec)
  • His counsellours are his eyes and eares; as they ought to be dear to him, so they ought to be true to him, and make him the true report of things without disguise. Cited from Machiavelli, Volume I, by Niccolo` Machiavelli
  • O noble Rome thou gat nat thy honours Nor general Empyre by suche Counsellours. Cited from The Ship of Fools, Volume 1-2, by Sebastian Brandt
  • And though it be true, that many eys see more then one; yet it is not to be understood of many Counsellours; but then only, when the finall Resolution is in one man. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • The most able Counsellours, are they that have least hope of benefit by giving evill Counsell, and most knowledge of those things that conduce to the Peace, and Defence of the Common-wealth. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • The wisdome of a Princes Counsellours is a great argument of the Princes wisdome. Cited from Machiavelli, Volume I, by Niccolo` Machiavelli
  • Counsellours Another Businesse of the Soveraign, is to choose good Counsellours; I mean such, whose advice he is to take in the Government of the Common-wealth. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • A man that doth his businesse by the help of many and prudent Counsellours, with every one consulting apart in his proper element, does it best, as he that useth able Seconds at Tennis play, placed in their proper stations. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • The Venetians haue alwayes their Podesta, or Gouernour, with his two Counsellours resident therein. Cited from Principal Navigations, Voyages and Discoveries, Vol. 9, Richard Hakluyt
  • Thirdly, that they that Exhort and Dehort, where they are required to give Counsell, are corrupt Counsellours, and as it were bribed by their own interest. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • In an Aristocracy, when any of the Assembly dyeth, the election of another into his room belongeth to the Assembly, as the Soveraign, to whom belongeth the choosing of all Counsellours, and Officers. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • The choyce of Counsellours therefore is to Monarchy; In which, the Soveraign that endeavoureth not to make choyce of those, that in every kind are the most able, dischargeth not his Office as he ought to do. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • Let us strengthen the hands of those in authority over us, and curb our own tongues, remembering that General Wait commonly proves in the end more than a match for General Headlong, and that the Good Book ascribes safety to a multitude, indeed, but not to a mob, of counsellours. Cited from The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell, by James Lowell
  • Let us strengthen the hands of those in authority over us, and curb out own tongues,[A] remembering that General Wait commonly proves in the end more than a match for General Headlong, and that the Good Book ascribes safety to a multitude, indeed, but not to a mob, of counsellours. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 52, February, 1862, by Various
  • Of euyl Counsellours, Juges and men of lawe. Cited from The Ship of Fools, Volume 1-2, by Sebastian Brandt