could hold her own

32 examples (0.03 sec)
  • When he was away, she could hold her own against the world. Cited from The Grey Lady, by Henry Seton Merriman
  • There is not a good woman in the country that could hold her own against her. Cited from The Conqueror, by Gertrude Franklin Atherton
  • The man was finally declared to her, and she could hold her own against him. Cited from The Crown Of Life, By George Gissing
  • She could hold her own, and perhaps she would be the better for having her way for a little. Cited from The Girl from Montana, by Grace Livingston Hill
  • She could hold her own on the terraces with the rest. Cited from The Roll-Call, by Arnold Bennett
  • Clementina stood waiting him, like a moon that could hold her own in the face of the sun. Cited from The Marquis of Lossie, by George MacDonald
  • Maud had more self-command than most women, and could hold her own even in so false a position as this. Cited from M. or N. "Similia similibus curantur", by G.J. Whyte-Melville
  • She was really very intelligent, could hold her own in any company, and with experience might become a positively brilliant woman. Cited from The Crown Of Life, By George Gissing
  • I examined her in algebra, and found that the little girl of thirteen could hold her own with many of a larger growth. Cited from A Lecture on Physical Development, by S.R. Calthrop
  • When she's well and bright Mrs. Povey could hold her own -- so I'm told. Cited from The Old Wives' Tale, by Arnold Bennett
  • Fust, that she could hold her own; and next that the day of wooden vessels in naval warfare was over. Cited from The Boy Scouts on Picket Duty, by Robert Shaler
  • If she had but her share of these things, she could hold her own against a hundred Maude and Lily Allens. Cited from Mother, by Kathleen Norris
  • Right forward a slight sea sometimes came over with a crash, but the vessel was in no trouble, and she looked as if she could hold her own in a much worse breeze. Cited from A Dream of the North Sea, by James Runciman
  • She would go, if she went, as a young woman of the world who could hold her own in any drawing-room, be it Madame Piriac's or another. Cited from The Lion's Share, by E. Arnold Bennett
  • She could hold her own well enough with the young subalterns she had hitherto flirted with, but this man was older, and had a bewildering effect on her. Cited from Bluebell, by Mrs. George Croft Huddleston
  • Canada -- using the name in its restricted sense -- was a position of great strength; and even when her dependencies were overcome, she could hold her own against forces far superior. Cited from Montcalm and Wolfe, by Francis Parkman
  • Anna Wheelright was a woman of great mental vigor, and could hold her own in a debate with her reverend disputants. Cited from The Continental Monthly, Vol. I, Mar, 1862, Number III, by Various
  • To his delight he found that she could hold her own in an argument with as close reasoning, as logical deduction, as keen interpretation, as any young man he knew. Cited from Red Pepper's Patients, by Grace S. Richmond
  • Her forces were too small for aught but defensive action, and it was difficult to conceive that she could hold her own against McClellan's magnificently appointed host. Cited from Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War, by G. F. R. Henderson
  • Clara was not going to marry Lady Aylmer, and did not fear but that she could hold her own against any mother-in-law in the world when once they should be brought face to face. Cited from The Belton Estate, Anthony Trollope
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