could draw him

21 examples (0.04 sec)
  • He did not volunteer much talk, but Robert soon found that he could draw him out. Cited from Robert Falconer, by George MacDonald
  • From this stand no one could draw him, nor were there any threats that could intimidate him. Cited from The Reign of Greed, by Jose Rizal
  • Not even the lure of a neighboring tavern could draw him from his post. Cited from Dope, by Sax Rohmer
  • She was wondering if by sheer clinging to him she could draw him out and up the stairs. Cited from Flappers and Philosophers, F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Then, again, this was my only way of getting down to his personal level, the only way I could draw him out and get at his real character. Cited from The Under Dog, by F. Hopkinson Smith
  • I wish I could draw him for you as he stands yonder looking the picture of good health, good spirits, and good-humour. Cited from Boys and Girls from Thackeray, by Kate Dickinson Sweetser
  • I wish I could draw him for you as he stands yonder, looking the picture of good health, good spirits, and good humour. Cited from The Newcomes, by William Makepeace Thackeray
  • Food and drink were brought to him, of which he partook with a most eager appetite, but no temptation could draw him any distance from his post. Cited from The Living Link, by James De Mille
  • If you had no pencil, you could draw him well enough with a poker, or the leg of a chair, or the smoke of a candle. Cited from Eothen, by A. W. Kinglake
  • But Joe still sat with his head on his hands, and not even the wonders of Niagara could draw him from his melancholy musings. Cited from Harriet, The Moses of Her People, by S.H. Bradford
  • Not all her beauty, not all her heart, not all her courage, could draw him while she would ride only a hobby horse, however tight its skin might be stuffed with emotions. Cited from The Marquis of Lossie, by George MacDonald
  • The days passed into weeks and months, and still he did not appear, and Starr, hearing more of his growing inaccessibility, determined to show the others that she could draw him out of his shell. Cited from Lo, Michael!, by Grace Livingston Hill
  • If but with my pen I could draw him, With terror you'd look in his face; For he, since the first day I saw him, Has sat there and sewed in his place. Cited from Songs of Labor and Other Poems,by Morris Rosenfeld
  • She might procrastinate, play false and loose, drive him to the very verge of madness by her coquetries, but she knew she could draw him back, like a bird held by a silken string. Cited from The Golden Dog, by William Kirby
  • Of great intellect, having read deeply, and reading still more deeply, he had the utmost dread of ladies, and not even his countrywoman, Mrs. Dusautoy, could draw him out. Cited from The Young Step-Mother,Charlotte M. Yonge
  • The drum and the fife could draw him as quickly now as when he was a boy, and the sweet singing of a woman's voice was all the token he wanted of the certainty of heaven and the existence of angels. Cited from Between Whiles, by Helen Hunt Jackson
  • But, after many lamentations, he thought he would carry off the girl to some secure place, whence nothing could draw him, and made his preparations in consequence, thinking that, once out of the kingdom, his friends or the sovereign could manage the monks and bring them to reason. Cited from The Sea-Witch, Maturin Murray
  • I won't tell you all the joy that followed in playing the fish till he was exhausted, and then leading him to a smooth shallow, where, having no landing-net, I could draw him steadily and quickly from the water and up the shelving rock without breaking the delicate line. Cited from Young Knights of the Empire,by Robert Baden-Powell
  • On the subject of his bass voice a child could draw him out, and, under the pretext of instituting a comparison between him and one of the bass choristers, Montgomery never failed to induce him to give the company an idea of his register. Cited from A Mummer's Wife, by George Moore
  • But not even the attraction of an unopened parcel of books he had carried home that afternoon from Clough End -- a loan from a young stationer he had lately made acquaintance with -- could draw him back to the farm. Cited from The History of David Grieve, by Mrs. Humphry Ward