correlation

All Noun
7,999 examples (0.06 sec)
  • Outside this limited set, however, it is clear no correlation can be found.
  • Its effects are more difficult to study, but some correlations have been established.
  • Research has shown correlations between economic and political issues and violence against women along the border.
  • It allowed for novel correlations that may have not been discovered without this method.
  • There is a high correlation between step length and height of a person.
  • So there should be a correlation with one or the other but not both.
  • There appears to be no direct correlation between this character and anyone living.
  • Some other correlations are apparently due to the manner in which natural selection can alone act. Cited from Origin of Species, 6th Ed., by Charles Darwin
  • Studies have noted significant correlations between these factors and major health issues.
  • He is best known for his research on word order correlations, which has been widely cited.
  • However, there is also a strong correlation between male and their territory characteristics.
  • Positive correlations are also found with volume in many other areas.
  • However, many other correlations have been proposed at various times.
  • The degree of order appears to be limited by the time and space allowed for longer-range correlations to be established.
  • It is the science of the beautiful through which men seek the correlation of the arts.
  • There is some evidence towards a correlation between performance in chess and intelligence among beginning players.
  • There are no positive correlations found as a result of this study.
  • Often the best correlation can be made when both European and indigenous sources give a specific date.
  • Correlations may exist, but we know nothing of them yet. Cited from Woman and Womanhood, by C. W. Saleeby
  • ETOPS operation has no direct correlation to water or distance over water.
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Words starting with correlation

Meaning of correlation

  • noun A reciprocal relation between two or more things
  • noun A statistical relation between two or more variables such that systematic changes in the value of one variable are accompanied by systematic changes in the other