conventionalists

All Noun
27 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The Thermidorian party was composed of the greater number of the conventionalists. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Several bloody engagements take place between the sections and conventionalists. Cited from Historical Epochs of the French Revolution, by H. Goudemetz
  • Next were recalled the proscribed conventionalists; already, some time since, their outlawry had been reversed. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Is there, then, no distinction or difference between the most hide-bound conventionalists and the most brilliant and bizarre innovators? Cited from What's Wrong With The World, by GK Chesterton
  • This eminent service secured the triumph of the Conventionalists, who now, assuming new names, continued in effect to discharge their old functions. Cited from The History of Napoleon Buonaparte, by John Gibson Lockhart
  • The charge of seducing women so frequently made against the street-railway magnate, so shocking to the yoked conventionalists, did not disturb him at all. Cited from The Titan, by Theodore Dreiser
  • It was what the French Conventionalists of 1793 called "desoler la patience" of their victims. Cited from Irish Race in the Past and the Present, by Thebaud
  • Notwithstanding this check, the conventionalists succeeded in isolating the insurrection, and this was a great point. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Operating near the capital, he plundered Conventionalists and Constitutionalists with equal impartiality, and as a diversion occasionally occupied the city itself. Cited from Hispanic Nations of the New World, Wm. R. Shepherd
  • But where churches were profaned, or constitutional priests molested, it was the work of local bodies or of individual Conventionalists on mission, not of the law. Cited from History of Modern Europe 1792-1878, by C. A. Fyffe
  • But if these separatists are bigoted and obstinate, the conventionalists on their side are ignorant and intolerant. Cited from A Residence in France, Complete, by An English Lady
  • Merlin, by a skilful amendment, restored the old safeguard of the conventionalists, and the assembly adopted Merlin's measure. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Composed of conventionalists, united by a common interest, and the necessity of establishing the republic, after having been blown about by the winds of all parties, they had manifested much good-will in their intercourse, and much union in their measures. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Furthermore, Conventionalists of the worst species, like Monestier and Foussedoire return to their natal department to govern it as government commissioners. Cited from The French Revolution V3, by Hippolyte Taine OCFV4
  • The struggle between the Conventionalists headed by Villa and the Constitutionalists under Carranza plunged Mexico into worse discord and misery than ever. Cited from Hispanic Nations of the New World, Wm. R. Shepherd
  • The attack of Vendemiaire was quite recent; and the republican party, especially dreading the counter-revolution, agreed to choose the directors only, from the conventionalists, and further from among those of them who had voted for the death of the king. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Bonaparte soon even employed those of the banished who, like Portalis, Simeon, Barbe-Marbois, had shown themselves more anti-conventionalists than counter-revolutionists. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Meantime, the conventionalists penetrated into the Hotel de Ville, traversed the desolate halls, seized the conspirators, and carried them in triumph to the assembly. Cited from History of the French Revolution, by F.A.M Mignet
  • Eventually the war against the Conventionalists was won after the assassination of Zapata in 1919 and the surrender of Villa in July 1920.
  • He gave offence to the conventionalists and the religiously orthodox by the freedom with which He criticized established beliefs and usages, by His championship of social outcasts, and by His association with persons of disreputable life. Cited from Religious Reality, by A.E.J. Rawlinson
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