Convention on Certain Conventional

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  • Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons restricts usage of such weapon systems.
  • Certain types of conventional weapons are also regulated or prohibited under the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
  • Most other countries no longer use them, since they are banned by Section III of the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
  • The department also advocates for universal participation on the antipersonnel mine-ban treaty and the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
  • After a reversal in the US position, in 2007 deliberations did begin on cluster munitions within the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
  • Following the assault, the United States military admitted it had employed white phosphorus artillery rounds, the use of which is not permitted in civilian areas under the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
  • Residents of Slaviansk claimed that white phosphorus incendiary bombs, which are banned by the UN Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, were dropped on the city.
  • The use of incendiary weapons against civilians was banned by signatory countries in the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons Protocol III.
  • The Oslo Process was launched largely in response to the failure of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) where five years of discussions failed to find an adequate response to these weapons.
  • International governmental deliberations in the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons turned on the broader problem of explosive remnants of war, a problem to which cluster munitions have contributed in a significant way.
  • The UN Office for Disarmament Affairs' approach to advocacy includes assistance to states parties to comply with the terms of the antipersonnel mine-ban treaty and the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
  • There was a concerted effort led by the US to develop a new protocol to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, but this proposal was rejected by over 50 states, together with civil society, ICRC and UN agencies.
  • Protocol V of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, adopted on 28 November 2003, sets out obligations and best practice for the clearance of explosive remnants of war.
  • Use of aerial incendiary bombs against civilian populations, including against military targets in civilian areas, was banned in the 1980 United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons Protocol III.
  • After the Vietnam War finished, most army use of flamethrowers was stopped by the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (concluded at Geneva on 10 October 1980 and entered into force in December 1983).
  • The U.S. has acknowledged humanitarian concerns about the use of cluster munitions, but insisted that the proper venue for a discussion of cluster munitions was the forum attached to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, which includes all major military powers.
  • The Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, not the Chemical Weapons Convention, goes on, in its Protocol III, to prohibit the use of all air-delivered incendiary weapons against civilian populations, or for indiscriminate incendiary attacks against military forces co-located with civilians.
  • Since Protocol III, of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons regulates Incendiary Weapons, and shells containing White Phosphorus, may be legal even in populated areas, more information is required to determine the legality of any shell landing in populated areas.
  • However a note on the Instalaza website states that the weapon remains in the catalog as a mark of their technological prowess and states that the weapon is in compliance with Amended Protocol II of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
  • The use of white phosphorus, as a marker, smokescreen layer or as a weapon, is not banned by Protocol III of the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons.
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