convenient to consider

24 examples (0.05 sec)
  • It will be convenient to consider the latter first and to find out what these witnesses were. Cited from The Common Law, by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
  • To test the latter, it would perhaps be more convenient to consider it under the head of the several forms of action. Cited from The Common Law, by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
  • It will be convenient to consider these problems under two heads: the composition of matter, and the origin of matter. Cited from Q. E. D., or New Light on the Doctrine of Creation, by Price
  • It will be convenient to consider the negative first. Cited from Thoughts on Religion, by George John Romanes
  • It is convenient to consider these papers together. Cited from Form and Function, by E. S. (Edward Stuart) Russell
  • They are sometimes described as one pair, namely, the eighth, but it is more convenient to consider them separately. Cited from A Practical Physiology, by Albert F. Blaisdell
  • Since the other elements in their families are either so rare that they cannot be studied in detail, or are best understood in connection with other elements, it is convenient to consider these three together at this point. Cited from An Elementary Study of Chemistry, by McPherson and Henderson
  • However, before we turn to the natural justice part of the case it is convenient to consider the claim of excess jurisdiction, and that by confining our attention to the terms of reference. Cited from Judgments...Court of New Zealand...Mt. Erebus Aircraft Disaster, Various
  • These it will for our present purpose be convenient to consider in connexion with each other, and without troubling ourselves too much concerning such nice differences of form as may be found to exist among them. Cited from Pastoral Poetry and Pastoral Drama, by Walter W. Greg
  • We must, then, take the individual as we find him in the state, but it is convenient to consider his morality separately from the ethics of the state, its institutions and its instruments. Cited from Handbook of Ethical Theory,George Stuart Fullerton
  • These factors, it will be seen, can easily be reduced to two, the organism and its environment; but it will be more convenient to consider them under the three-fold division which has just been mentioned. Cited from Crime and Its Causes, by William Douglas Morrison
  • Before making some concluding remarks on the relations of the spaces coloured blue and red, it will be convenient to consider the position on our map of the volcanoes historically known to have been in action. Cited from Coral Reefs, by Charles Darwin
  • It is convenient to consider the digits as arranged to form fractions of the respective values, one-half, one-third, one-fourth, one-fifth, one-sixth, one-seventh, one-eighth, and one-ninth. Cited from Amusements in Mathematics, by Henry Ernest Dudeney
  • It is convenient to consider sodium next, because it is the basic pattern on which not only copper, silver and gold are formed, but also chlorine, bromine and iodine. Cited from Occult Chemistry, by Annie Besant and Charles W. Leadbeater
  • This led to the regulation or prohibition of certain trades conducted in tenement houses or in sweat shops, and to other matters which we shall find it more convenient to consider under the head of labor legislation. Cited from Popular Law-making, by Frederic Jesup Stimson
  • It is much more convenient to consider all angles as positive in astronomical tables, but for other purposes it may be more convenient to employ negative angles also, especially when, by so doing, you avoid the use of large numbers. Cited from International Conference ... Fixing a Prime Meridian ..., by Various
  • In reviewing, so far as our materials permit, the manners and customs of the Assyrians, it will be convenient to consider separately their warlike and their peaceful usages. Cited from The Seven Great Monarchies, Vol 2. (of 7): Assyria, by George Rawlinson
  • For there had been orders sent through all the towns, to make public search for Marius, and if they found him to kill him; however, the magistrates thought convenient to consider a little better of it first, and sent him prisoner to the house of one Fannia. Cited from Plutarch's Lives, A. H. Clough,
  • But this was not a time for nice disquisitions; to distrust the king of Prussia might have provoked him, and it was most convenient to consider him as a friend, till he appeared openly as an enemy. Cited from The Works of Samuel Johnson, Vol. 6, by Samuel Johnson
  • As, on the other hand, all the other elements of the synthesis are psychical, invisible, and reduced to being faculties and powers, it may be convenient to consider them as occupying the centre of the body or of the brain. Cited from The Mind and the Brain, by Alfred Binet
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