convenient receptacle

17 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The envelopes may be of any size desired and kept in any convenient receptacle. Cited from The Art of Public Speaking, by Carnegie and Esenwein
  • A small two-handled bath is the most convenient receptacle for the waste water. Cited from Things To Make, by Archibald Williams
  • A very convenient receptacle is a deep, quart aluminum cup, which may be readily carried about. Cited from The Mother and Her Child, by William S. Sadler and Lena K. Sadler
  • In a corner of the room stood her travelling-box, a convenient receptacle into which to put the new purchases as they arrived from the shops. Cited from More about Pixie, by Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey
  • Now it seemed a convenient receptacle for the necklace, and I suddenly planned out my way of giving it to Raoul. Cited from The Powers and Maxine, by Charles Norris Williamson
  • It is also convenient to the adult worker as a convenient receptacle for his savings. Cited from Thrift, by Samuel Smiles
  • Under the most depending part of the slope they affix a shell, or some other convenient receptacle, into which the milky juice flows. Cited from The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom, by P. L. Simmonds
  • When the old castle was allowed to fall into ruin, the secret passages, etc., were used by smugglers as a convenient receptacle for contraband goods. Cited from Secret Chambers and Hiding Places, by Allan Fea
  • More than all, we made away with the dummy child, broke up the parcel, resolved it into its component parts, a small pillow and many wraps, all of which we put away in the same convenient receptacle. Cited from The Passenger from Calais, by Arthur Griffiths
  • As to the grapes they kept perfectly to the last day and proved delicious; the box then became a convenient receptacle for the children's toys; while the cake-box has turned into a medicine-chest. Cited from The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss, by George L. Prentiss
  • He had pulled out the stone from a hole between the boulders, which, running in quite deeply, had served as a convenient receptacle for certain treasures and accumulations, and was therefore called the cupboard. Cited from Five Little Peppers and their Friends,M Sidney
  • Nevertheless, if it was no use to England, it was a place of importance to France, as commanding a large extent of coast, and affording a convenient receptacle to privateers, whence it was insisted on as a valuable article of exchange, when peace was concluded between the two nations. Cited from History of England in Three Volumes, Vol. III, by E. Farr & E. H. Nolan
  • In their canoes, they deposit these girdles in the crowns of their hats; nor is it unusual, when a shower threatens them on shore, to see them place this sole garment in the same convenient receptacle, and then make for shelter. Cited from Journal of an African Cruiser, by Horatio Bridge
  • His Latin compositions seem to have had much of his fondness, for he collected a second volume of the Musae Anglicanae, perhaps, for a convenient receptacle, in which all his Latin pieces are inserted, and where his poem on the Peace has the first place. Cited from Lives of the Poets, Vol. 1, by Samuel Johnson
  • His Latin compositions seem to have had much of his fondness, for he collected a second volume of the "Musae Anglicanae" perhaps for a convenient receptacle, in which all his Latin pieces are inserted, and where his poem on the Peace has the first place. Cited from Lives of Poets: Addison etc by Samuel Johnson
  • She had been unceremoniously dumped into his arms by a delegate from the Foundling Asylum, who had found him the most convenient receptacle nearest the door; and he had been offered the meager information that she belonged to no one, was wrong somehow, and a hospital was the place for her. Cited from The Primrose Ring, by Ruth Sawyer
  • Grandma had already set an example to her guests by making a convenient receptacle of her capacious lap, and pouring some of the corn into it, an example which the fortunate scions of the skirted tribe, now arranged in rows on one side of the room, followed, each in turn. Cited from Cape Cod Folks, by Sarah P. McLean Greene