constitutionally incapable

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • I don't think he ever made friends with anyone in his life -- he is constitutionally incapable of friendship. Cited from The Silent Isle, by Arthur Christopher Benson
  • Besides, like young Peter, he seemed constitutionally incapable of success. Cited from The Lee Shore, by Rose Macaulay
  • His nature was such that whatever he did was done with all his heart, and all his power; and he was constitutionally incapable of doing it otherwise. Cited from V1 Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay, by Trevelyan
  • Woman, concluded the professor, is constitutionally incapable of distinguishing between right and wrong, between truth and falsehood. Cited from The Patient Observer, by Simeon Strunsky
  • He meant well, in a general way, but his good intentions proved descending paving-stones because he was constitutionally incapable of meaning anything very hard. Cited from Queed, by Henry Sydnor Harrison
  • Ann S. Stephens called him two-faced and "constitutionally incapable of speaking the truth".
  • The Faith was meant for Arabia and not for the world, hence it is constitutionally incapable of change or development. Cited from Two Old Faiths, by J. Murray Mitchell and William Muir
  • The men who do things in the world, the men worthy of admiration and imitation, are men constitutionally incapable of any such pecksniffian stupidity. Cited from Damn! by Henry Louis Mencken
  • The accepted view among Cradock's colleagues was that he was "constitutionally incapable of refusing action".
  • Constitutionally incapable of vice, he held in repugnance even that degree of materialism in the view of sexual relations which is common to men who have grown their beards. Cited from A Life's Morning, by George Gissing
  • Promptitude however was the one thing of which Philip was constitutionally incapable, and Guise was obliged to consent to wait till the following spring. Cited from England Under the Tudors, by Arthur D. Innes
  • The very high Adepts, therefore, do help humanity, but only spiritually: they are constitutionally incapable of meddling with worldly affairs. Cited from Five Years Of Theosophy, by Various
  • In philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, cognitive closure is the proposition that human minds are constitutionally incapable of solving certain perennial philosophical problems.
  • At times, wearied out with himself, he seems to have felt the need of retreat and quiet; but he was almost as constitutionally incapable of keeping still, as certain modern statesmen in their retirement from public life. Cited from The Faith of the Millions (2nd series), by George Tyrrell
  • The ultra-erotic verse of that poet somehow suggests a wild hullabaloo raised to divert our attention from the fact that he was constitutionally incapable of experiencing passion. Cited from The Poet's Poet, by Elizabeth Atkins
  • Luce reported that "Cradock was constitutionally incapable of refusing or even postponing action if there was the smallest chance of success".
  • The provinces jointly or severally would be constitutionally incapable of passing this legislation, and the failure to include one or more provinces or localities would jeopardize successful operation of the legislation in other parts of the country.
  • In their cause no harm was done to the cause of love, because these races are constitutionally incapable of romantic love; but in higher stages of civilization the strict seclusion of the women was a fatal obstacle to love. Cited from Primitive Love and Love-Stories, by Henry Theophilus Finck
  • My acquaintance with the unhappy victim was but recent; still, I saw and knew enough of the man to be certain (and I hope I have seen and known enough of other men to judge) that he was a man constitutionally incapable of committing an act of violence, whether against himself or anybody else. Cited from The Grey Wig: Stories and Novelettes, by Israel Zangwill
  • He was constitutionally incapable of tolerating pretentious ignorance, and he had realised from the first that there could be no question of giving and taking quarter from persons who were more concerned to suppress doctrines they conceived to be dangerous than to examine into their truth. Cited from Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work, P. Chalmers Mitchell
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