congressman from

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  • There were also a few congressmen from the south who had been members of this organization. Cited from Rise of the New West, 1819-1829, by F.J. Turner
  • Three congressmen from each party were scheduled to attend, but did not.
  • He was elected as a US Congressman from Virginia from here.
  • The teacher had announced that numerous white citizens would be present; among them the congressman from the district and the mayor of the town. Cited from Imperium in Imperio: A Study Of The Negro Race Problem, Sutton E. Griggs
  • He became a leading national figure in the Democratic Party and was elected Congressman from New York.
  • She named the college after her husband, Russell, who was a Congressman from New York.
  • After the war, he was elected to three terms as U.S. Congressman from Wisconsin.
  • He was the first Republican congressman from Texas to be elected after the end of Reconstruction.
  • Sensibly, however, she decided that Congressmen from Texas meant little in the life of the London police. Cited from The Agony Column, by Earl Derr Biggers
  • He was the 39th Governor of New York and a long-serving congressman from the same state.
  • His brother Dan Crane served alongside him as Congressman from another Illinois district for three terms.
  • Indeed, Rangel never showed any interest in a different political job other than being the Congressman from Harlem.
  • Morgan later served as a three-term postbellum United States Congressman from Ohio.
  • Congress began by refusing seats to congressmen from states reconstructed on Johnson's plan. Cited from A School History of the United States, by John Bach McMaster
  • Two of his great uncles served as Democratic congressmen from Pennsylvania.
  • He served as a United States Congressman from Tennessee, representing the tenth district.
  • The debonair Congressman from the Empire State was quite equal to the occasion. Cited from The Statesmen Snowbound, by Robert Fitzgerald
  • Most of the congressmen from the former Confederate states were either prevented from leaving the state or were arrested on the way to the capital.
  • His nephew, also named John Franklin Miller, was later a congressman from Washington.
  • The two most eloquent Congressmen from the South were selected to lead the prosecution. Cited from The Abolitionists, by John F. Hume
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