confession of her love

22 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Why had I not used my opportunity to make her love me -- to force from her the confession of her love? Cited from Vandemark's Folly, by Herbert Quick
  • The sense of her true position toward him revealed itself in all its horror as the confession of her love escaped her lips. Cited from The New Magdalen, by Wilkie Collins
  • To him, in old days -- in days which now seemed to her to be very old -- she had made confession of her love. Cited from The Claverings, by Anthony Trollope
  • This was to be an ordeal profoundly more difficult than the confession of her love. Cited from The Desert of Wheat, by Zane Grey
  • In her glad cry at his coming he heard the confession of her love; he read it in her eyes, yet he did not call her Maritza. Cited from Princess Maritza, by Percy Brebner
  • But there is something that excites in us a stronger feeling than all this -- it is Viola's confession of her love. Cited from Characters of Shakespeare's Plays, Wm. Hazlitt
  • But he did linger, till once more he had drawn from her a confession of her love, that none other could take his place, even while she conjured him never to seek her again -- and so they parted. Cited from The Vale of Cedars , by Grace Aguilar
  • She does herself the violence to make This dear confession of her love, and you Are not yet satisfied, and will not be Without the granting of her utmost favours? Cited from Tartuffe, by Jean Baptiste Poquelin Moliere
  • She was deeply mortified to think he had won from her a confession of her love, and then told her how useless -- nay, worse -- how wicked it was for her to think of him. Cited from Rosamond, by Mary J. Holmes
  • The courtiers are then minutely described; but the description is broken off abruptly, and we are introduced to Rosial in the midst of a confession of her love. Cited from Canterbury Tales and Other Poems, Geoffrey Chaucer
  • When she retired that night she sought ease from her anxiety in a prayer that was half a petition for O'Neil's success and half an exceedingly full and frank confession of her love for him. Cited from The Iron Trail, by Rex Beach
  • He was thinking how mean he must appear in Miss Halliday's eyes, if she came to understand that he had known her to be John Haygarth's heiress at the time he won from her the sweet confession of her love. Cited from Birds of Prey, by M.E. Braddon
  • The old man told at once what Darius desired to know -- that he had seen a letter, written in Nitetis' own hand, in which she made a direct confession of her love to Bartja and asked him to meet her alone. Cited from An Egyptian Princess, by Georg Ebers, v6
  • He had seen her on the stage bid a pathetic good-by to her lover, and there it was beautiful enough -- with her shy coquetries, and her winning ways, and the timid, reluctant confession of her love. Cited from Macleod of Dare, by William Black
  • And now, as his wandering gaze rested upon the arm-chair where, kneeling at her feet, he had received the intoxicating confession of her love, he started forward, and, burying his face in its cushions, wept aloud. Cited from Prince Eugene, by Louisa Muhlbach
  • She did not violate any of the laws of maiden modesty, because she was pure in heart and single of purpose; but she was too truthful to withhold the confession of her love, and too sincere to conceal her happiness. Cited from Turns of Fortune, by Mrs. S. C. Hall
  • Ah, count, if you knew how my conscience reproaches me when I listen to the pure and holy confession of her love, when trembling and blushing she whispers to me the secrets of her youthful heart, and flies to me seeking protection against her own weakness! Cited from Frederick the Great and His Court, L. Muhlbach
  • While she had been making confession of her love to the Roman as if it were her last will and testament, Publius felt like a man dying of thirst, who has been led to a flowing well only to be forbidden to moisten his lips with the limpid fluid. Cited from The Sisters, by Georg Ebers, v4
  • The confession of her love, which she believed was returned, the wrong done by her to her cavalier, and the experience of an unknown pleasure, emboldened the fair Marie, who fell into a platonic love, gently tempered with those little indulgences in which there is no danger. Cited from Droll Stories, Complete, by Honore de Balzac
  • So the night passed, and the next day came, bringing toil to the weary, joy to the happy, wealth to the rich, and sorrow to the sad -- bringing Edgar to Leam, and Leam to the deeper consciousness and confession of her love. Cited from Lippincott's Magazine Vol. XVII. No. 101. May, 1876, by Various
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