collards

All Noun
64 examples (0.02 sec)
  • In this country, you will often hear of long collards, a favorite dish of the planter. Cited from Letters of a Traveller, by William Cullen Bryant
  • Collards, you will understand, are a kind of cabbage. Cited from Letters of a Traveller, by William Cullen Bryant
  • Now, when I has a mind to cook some turnips or some collards, I makes dis here boil bread. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Part 1, by Work Projects Admin.
  • We had good collards, turnips and other good vegetables. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Pt. 2, by Work Projects Admin.
  • Oh, we had big chunk of lightwood en cook meat en hoecake en collards right dere in de woods. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Part 1, by Work Projects Admin.
  • We always had meat and plenty milk, collards and potatoes. Cited from Slave Narratives: Arkansas Narratives, Part 3, by Work Projects Admin.
  • The kale, or Georgia collards, is grown in the South, where cabbages fail to head. Cited from Manual of Gardening (Second Edition), L. H. Bailey
  • I got to get dese collards boilin hard, else dey ain' gwine get done time you chillun start puffin for your dinner. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Part 1, by Work Projects Admin.
  • English-grown drumhead cabbage seed is utterly worthless for use in this country except to raise greens or collards. Cited from Cabbages and Cauliflowers: How to Grow Them, James John Howard Gregory
  • Dem bigger ones, dey would give dem clabber en boil peas en collards sometimes. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Pt. 2, by Work Projects Admin.
  • De most we had ter eat, was corn, collards, peas, turnip-greens and home-made molasses. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Pt. 2, by Work Projects Admin.
  • "Coon and collards is pretty good fixins, but 'gator and turnips I can't go, no how." Cited from Letters of a Traveller, by William Cullen Bryant
  • There are three major disease of collards: Alternaria, downy mildew, and black rot.
  • In winter dey et sweet 'tatoes, collards, turnips and sich, but I et lak de white folkses. Cited from Slave Narratives: Georgia, Pt. 1, by Work Projects Administration
  • They come in the yard and steal my potatoes, collards, turnips, ochre (okra?), and so on. Cited from Slave Narratives: Arkansas, Pt. 6, by Work Projects Administration
  • All de niggers would go dere to de pot on Sunday en get dey eatin like turnips en collards en meat en carry it to dey house en make dey own bread. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Pt. 2, by Work Projects Admin.
  • The master had a big garden and raised lots of green vegetables like turnips, collards, cabbages and some okra, but little beans except cornfield beans. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Pt. 2, by Work Projects Admin.
  • We had wash pot full of collards or turnip salad. Cited from Slave Narratives: Arkansas, Pt. 6, by Work Projects Administration
  • Common vegetables described as winter greens are chard, collards, rapini, and kale.
  • We've got turnip greens, onions and collards. Cited from The Man in Gray, by Thomas Dixon
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Root form of collards is collard for the noun.

Meaning of collards

  • noun Kale that has smooth leaves
  • noun Variety of kale having smooth leaves