collagen deposition

23 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The growth of tissue around the wound site is a result of the migration of cells and collagen deposition by these cells.
  • T cells accumulate in the skin; these are thought to secrete cytokines and other proteins that stimulate collagen deposition.
  • One NSAID in particular, indomethacin can inhibit new collagen deposition thus impairing the healing process for the infarcted region.
  • The result is excess fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition that outgrows the original site of dermal injury.
  • In the latter stages of the disease, the pathology is associated with collagen deposition and fibrosis, resulting in organ damage that may be only partially reversible.
  • Eventually, dermal fibroblasts overproduce extracellular matrix leading to increased tissue collagen deposition in the skin.
  • Any injury to human vocal folds elicits a wound healing process characterized by disorganized collagen deposition and, eventually, formation of scar tissue.
  • Acetaldehyde may be responsible for alcohol-induced fibrosis by stimulating collagen deposition by hepatic stellate cells.
  • Cellular granulation and collagen deposition occur within the basement membrane.
  • Collagen deposition is important because it increases the strength of the wound; before it is laid down, the only thing holding the wound closed is the fibrin-fibronectin clot, which does not provide much resistance to traumatic injury.
  • In theory, it is thought that radiofrequency induced IAS injury may cause collagen deposition and fibrosis (scarring), resulting in the affected area tightening.
  • Even for longer periods, HA content in fetal wounds is still higher than that in adult wounds, which suggests that HA may, at least in part, reduce collagen deposition and therefore lead to reduced scarring.
  • The proliferation phase is characterized by angiogenesis, collagen deposition, granulation tissue formation, epithelialization, and wound contraction.
  • By the fourth day, phagocytosis of contaminated tissues is well underway, and the processes of epithelization, collagen deposition, and maturation are occurring.
  • Histological evidence supporting diastolic dysfunction demonstrates ventricular hypertrophy, increased interstitial collagen deposition and infiltration of the myocardium.
  • Morphea is a thickening and hardening of the skin and subcutaneous tissues from excessive collagen deposition.
  • It is a chronic osteomyelitis with subperiosteal bone and collagen deposition.
  • After a week there is also beginning of granulation tissue formation at margins, which matures during the following month, and gets increased collagen deposition and decreased cellularity until the myocardial scarring is fully mature at approximately 2 months after infarction.
  • It is thought that asbestos fibres that reach the pleura induce subpleural fibroblasts and mesothelial cells to produce scar tissue and collagen deposition, resulting in subpleural thickening.
  • In adult humans, injured tissue are repaired by collagen deposition, collagen remodelling and eventual scar formation, where fetal wound healing is believed to be more of a regenerative process with minimal or no scar formation.
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