Codex Aureus

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  • As with other examples of the Codex Aureus (i.e. golden books), the text is written in gold ink.
  • For this library contains among its choicest treasures no manuscript entirely written upon purple vellum, the Codex Aureus being only partially thus stained. Cited from Studies from Court and Cloister, J.M. Stone
  • Another famous document from the monastic library is the Codex Aureus of Lorsch.
  • The manuscript collection also includes the Stockholm Codex Aureus.
  • The Codex Aureus of Echternach, an important surviving codex written entirely in gold ink was produced here in the 11th century.
  • Considering gold letters in the manuscript and its location at Lorsch, it was named the Codex Aureus Laurensius.
  • "This day the Codex Aureus Latinus was cleared out of the king's warehouse, and delivered into my custody." Cited from Studies from Court and Cloister, J.M. Stone
  • Several Gospel Books from the 9th through 11th centuries were so heavily illuminated with gold leaf that they were referred to as the Codex Aureus.
  • The Codex Aureus is one of just two manuscripts which was kept at Echternach over the centuries, most of the others being produced for the Holy Roman Emperor Henry III.
  • A very similar image of Charles the Bald found in the Codex Aureus of St Emmeram is the inspiration for this coronation image.
  • The first documented reference is from 779 in the Codex Aureus of Lorsch.
  • The 8th-century Cotton Bede shows mixed elements in the decoration, as does the Stockholm Codex Aureus of similar period, probably written in Canterbury.
  • Recent scholars tend to group the Lindau Gospels and the Arnulf Ciborium in closer relation to each other than the Codex Aureus to either.
  • The Codex Aureus of Echternach is an early 11th-century illuminated Gospel Book containing the Vulgate versions of the four gospels.
  • The cover of the Codex Aureus of St. Emmeram, which can be precisely dated to 870, is probably a product of the same workshop, though there are differences of style.
  • Its location is uncertain but several manuscripts are attributed to it, with the Codex Aureus of St. Emmeram (870) being the last and most spectacular.
  • It is not known for certain where the Palace School was then based (after its previous base at St Martin's Abbey in Tours was destroyed in 853), but it had probably moved to the Basilica of St Denis outside Paris by the time of the Codex Aureus's production.
  • Very few of these have survived intact, as they have been broken up for their precious materials, but a fair number of the ivory panels have survived, as they were hard to recycle; the divided panels from the Codex Aureus of Lorsch are among the most notable.
  • Some just use purple parchment for sections of the work; the 8th century Anglo-Saxon Stockholm Codex Aureus alternates dyed and un-dyed pages.
  • Moreover, the impact of the frames is significantly reduced in favour of the figural scenes by their narrowness and the flat relief, so that they appear like the images of a contemporary illustrated manuscript, like the Codex Aureus of Echternach.
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