chromatic alteration

12 examples (0.03 sec)
  • The final section of the development begins with a chromatic alteration of D natural to D-sharp.
  • Therefore, like the Augmented sixth chords it should be assigned to a separate category of chromatic alteration.
  • From this, he argues that the mediant and its chromatic alteration combines the first three to produce the fourth tonal function.
  • False relation is in this case desirable since this chromatic alteration follows a melodic idea, the rising 'melodic minor'.
  • While it is clear by the end of the passage that the tonic key is F major, the chromatic alterations made in the first five measures may suggest C minor or F mixolydian.
  • In such circumstances, the Neapolitan sixth is a chromatic alteration of the subdominant, and it has an immediately recognizable and poignant sound.
  • The Musica practica also contains interesting commentary on mensural notation, chromatic alterations, examples of counterpoint, musical instruments, and the division of music and its effects.
  • F is commonly found after E in the same measure in pieces where E is in the key signature, in order to represent a diatonic, rather than a chromatic semitone; writing an E with a following E is regarded as a chromatic alteration of one scale degree.
  • E is commonly found before F in the same measure in pieces where F is in the key signature, in order to represent a diatonic, rather than a chromatic semitone; writing an F with a following F is regarded as a chromatic alteration of one scale degree.
  • The augmented unison, the interval produced by the augmentation, or widening by one-half step, of the perfect unison, does not occur between diatonic scale steps, but instead between a scale step and a chromatic alteration of the same step.
  • Pedal harps are essentially diatonic instruments which are fitted with the double-action pedal mechanism to allow chromatic alterations and key changes: no matter how the pedals are set, the pedal harp still has only seven strings per octave.
  • Smaller harps, often called folk, lever or Celtic harps, are equally diatonic instruments (also with seven strings per octave) and use a mechanical lever on each string which must be moved manually to obtain chromatic alterations.