chlorine bleach

41 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Chlorine bleach and alcohol do not cause resistance because they are so completely lethal, in a very direct physical way.
  • Sometimes confused with chlorine bleach, household bleach has a completely different chemistry.
  • Some of these are naturally occurring in the wood, but chlorine bleaching of the pulp produces far larger amounts.
  • At home, this can be done effectively with a diluted chlorine bleach.
  • To use chlorine bleach effectively, the surface or item to be disinfected must be clean.
  • At this stage, chlorine bleach may be added to either lighten the paper entirely or to create a mix of shades to create a marbled effect.
  • Simple chlorine bleach and muriatic acid were readily available at this time, as they were used to sterilise swimming pools.
  • Chance of transmission is also reduced by disinfecting household surfaces, which can be done effectively with a diluted chlorine bleach solution.
  • Made from the mulberry plant, kozo paper is ideal for printing in that it doesn't use chlorine bleaching and is stronger than regular papers.
  • By pretreating wood pulp with this enzyme, paper manufacturers can achieve comparable levels of whiteness with much less chlorine bleach.
  • One gram of a 100% active chlorine bleach has the same bleaching power as one gram of chlorine.
  • The city is attempting to solve this by adding chlorine bleach to the pipes, a proposal that has raised environmental objections.
  • Chlorine bleach is another accepted liquid sterilizing agent.
  • PCDDs are formed through combustion, chlorine bleaching and manufacturing processes.
  • Chlorine bleach kills the VHS virus, but in concentrations that are much too caustic for ordinary use.
  • The high resistance of Cryptosporidium oocysts to disinfectants such as chlorine bleach enables them to survive for long periods and still remain infective.
  • Dioxin, a group of highly toxic chemicals are released during combustion processes, pesticide manufacturing and chlorine bleaching of wood pulp.
  • The water supplies may include bottled water, filtering kit, bottles, collapsible water containers, and chlorine bleach for water purification.
  • In 19th century England, Roger was slang for the cloud of toxic green gas that swept through the chlorine bleach factories periodically.
  • It was later converted to chemical plant, owned by Thor Chemicals, and produced chlorine bleaching agents for use in the dye industry in Manchester at the time.
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