censure of the world

22 examples (0.03 sec)
  • I was once afraid of the censure of the world. Cited from Moon-Face and Other Stories by Jack London
  • Show me clearly the line which divides right and wrong, that I may not fear the censure of the world. Cited from Leaves of Life, by Margaret Bird Steinmetz
  • And therefore philosophers must inevitably fall under the censure of the world? Cited from The Republic by Plato, Tr. by Benjamin Jowett
  • She has already incurred the censure of the world. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 4 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • The censure of the world, the anguish of friends, the clinging arms of love, were nothing now to her. Cited from Malbone: An Oldport Romance by Thomas W. Higginson
  • For the censure of the world at large they did not care, but Phillips' defection almost broke their hearts. Cited from Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2), by Ida Husted Harper
  • He has, in many cases, very successfully defended Cromwell; he has yielded his conduct, in others, to the just censure of the world. Cited from Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753), Vol. V, Cibber
  • For the rest, he was honourable in his general dealings because he was afraid to suffer the censure of the world, and just from a better motive. Cited from Guy Mannering, Vol. II, by Sir Walter Scott
  • For the rest, he was honourable in his general dealings, because he was afraid to suffer the censure of the world, and just from a better motive. Cited from Guy Mannering, by Walter Scott
  • Everything; the anger of my father, the reproaches of my family, the censure of the world, and, above all, Valere, a change in your heart! Cited from The Miser, by Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
  • This, said Luther, is the censure of the world concerning God's Word; therefore we must let them run on their course towards that place which is prepared for them. Cited from Selections from the Table Talk of Martin Luther
  • Yet his vanity was keenly sensitive to disapprobation, and when the censure of the world coincided with the condemnation of his own reason he suffered. Cited from The Philistines, by Arlo Bates
  • To say that, with all this, she was not happy, nor escaped the censure of the world, is but to assign to her that share of shadow, without which nothing bright ever existed on this earth. Cited from Life of R. B. Sheridan, V2, by Thomas Moore
  • For the censure of the world, its meddling and mouthing hypocrisy, I care absolutely nothing; I have long set it at defiance. Cited from The Evil Guest, by J. Sheridan Le Fanu
  • In thus disposing of myself, I know I shall incur the censure of the world; but if I did not love you more than I fear the world, I should not be worthy of you. Cited from The History of Tom Jones, a foundling, H. Fielding
  • This system of discipline, as thus introduced by George Fox, and as thus enlarged by the society afterwards, has not escaped, notwithstanding the loveliness of its theory, the censure of the world. Cited from A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume I (of 3), by Thomas Clarkson
  • The Fellows, already angry with themselves for having conceded so much, and galled by the censure of the world, eagerly caught at the opportunity which was now offered them of regaining the public esteem. Cited from History of England, James II Vol. 2, Macaulay
  • And yet these we must condemn ourselves to, in order to avoid the censure of the world; to shun the contempt of others, we must ally ourselves to those we despise; we must prefer birth, title, and fortune, to real merit. Cited from Joseph Andrews, Vol. 2, by Henry Fielding
  • To which I reply that not even the lover would advise you to indulge all lovers, for the indiscriminate favour is less esteemed by the rational recipient, and less easily hidden by him who would escape the censure of the world. Cited from Phaedrus, by Plato, Trans by Ben. Jowett
  • I may observe, therefore, that the circumstance of a more than ordinary profession of consistency, and not any supposed immorality on the part of the Quakers, has brought them, in the instances alluded to, under the censure of the world. Cited from A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume II (of 3), by Thomas Clarkson
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