censure if

20 examples (0.04 sec)
  • I speak not from my own knowledge, but from the report of all, who would be pleased enough to censure if they could find a cause. Cited from The Parisians, by E. B. Lytton, Book 10
  • The risk and pressure of social censure if he failed to live up to expectations was also a form of mos.
  • Vavasor could stand a good deal of censure if mingled with some praise -- which he called appreciation. Cited from Weighed and Wanting, by George MacDonald
  • But at this thing the world might look and understand and censure if it were not brass-browed and stupid. Cited from Here are Ladies, by James Stephens
  • His impassive periods were always associated with whimsical sensitiveness of being censured if his adventures should miscarry. Cited from Drake, Nelson and Napoleon, by Walter Runciman
  • My salvation lay in the future, which, now that my conscience was awakened, I would have only myself to censure if it did not become what I wished. Cited from Wide Courses, by James Brendan Connolly
  • The practice of bleeding, which by many persons was thought to have killed him, was then so widely used that his doctors would have been censured If they had omitted it. Cited from George Washington, by William Roscoe Thayer
  • The position was one which was one which might have well been pronounced impregnable, and Wolfe could hardly have been censured if he had then and there abandoned all hope of success. Cited from Canadian Notabilities, Volume 1, John Charles Dent
  • And we shall scarcely be censured if, on this his festival, we be found lingering near his shrine, how worthless soever may be the offering which we bring to it. Cited from Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIII, by John Lord
  • So the doer is censured if he faileth. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1
  • And in the pursuit of his love the custom of mankind allows him to do many strange things, which philosophy would bitterly censure if they were done from any motive of interest, or wish for office or power. Cited from Symposium, by Plato, B. Jowett, Trans.
  • This was lukewarm praise, but coming from Sallust, who would have censured if he could, it is as eloquent as any eulogy. Cited from Life of Cicero, Vol. 1 by Anthony Trollope
  • He also claimed that Parliament would always retain the power to dismiss his government by vote of censure if its policies failed or if it attempted to "override basic British freedoms".
  • Pope Gregory IX authorized the Archbishop to apply acts of religious censure if it were necessary to persuade the monarch to change his policy.
  • Then, Sir, with regard to the language of the despatch, I do not know of any Government or Minister who would not be open to censure if we chose to take up every word in a despatch. Cited from Speeches on Public Policy, V1, by John Bright
  • Not only are they vulgar and commonplace, but they are malformed: well might Donatello long for criticism and censure if these two stupid little urchins were standards of his production. Cited from Donatello, by David Lindsay, Earl of Crawford
  • The good lady was not to be harshly censured if she now and then, in private confabulation with her favorite, let fall a remark which was the reverse of complimentary to her niece-in-law. Cited from At Last, by Marion Harland
  • A widow would incur censure if she married within two years after her husband's death; indeed, if her marriage followed soon after the expiration of that term, Mrs. Grundy would infer some surreptitious courting had been going on. Cited from Mother's Remedies, by T. J. Ritter
  • Islamic scholars consider this directive a balance between the mourning of a husband's death and the protection of a widow from cultural or societal censure if she became interested in remarrying after her husband's death, often an economic necessity.
  • Now, it cannot be denied but that he ought to have taken care not to pass with his friends either for a liar or a visionary; and yet how could he avoid incurring that censure if the events had not justified the truth of the things he pretended were revealed to him? Cited from The Memorable Thoughts of Socrates, by Xenophon