censure has

22 examples (0.04 sec)
  • The man who will not endure censure has to take care that he does not deserve it. Cited from Dr. Wortle's School, by Anthony Trollope
  • Severe censure has been cast upon them because of their traces of Spinoza. Cited from History of Rationalism, by John F. Hurst
  • Unlike impeachment, in the United States censure has no explicit basis in the federal constitution.
  • It is rather his duty to give praise where praise is due, censure where censure has been earned, regardless of consequences to himself. Cited from Campaign Pictures of the War in South Africa (1899-1900), by A. G. Hales
  • In the history of the House, censure has been used 23 times, and most of the cases arose during the 19th century.
  • Whatever she has thought liable to just censure has in the present edition been amended, as far as is consistent with the identity of the story. Cited from Tales and Novels, Vol. VII, by Maria Edgeworth
  • In conclusion we would remark that although much censure has been cast upon us, we are renewedly convinced of the goodness and the justice of our cause. Cited from The Journal of Negro History, Volume 6, 1921, by Various
  • But in this case censure has been too quick to interpret suspicious circumstances -- suspicious, I admit. Cited from Denzil Quarrier, George Gissing
  • Censure has been a much more common form of disciplinary action in Congress over the years, as it requires a much lower threshold of votes to impose.
  • The censure has sparked discussion over the differences between standalone museums and collections held by private non-profit entities like colleges and universities.
  • Much undeserved censure has been heaped upon the Irish lines; sins have been assumed from which they are free, and their virtues have ever been ignored. Cited from Fifty Years of Railway Life in England, Scotland and Ireland, by Tatlow
  • And when the ministers and members of this church have been processed before her assemblies, and convicted of maintaining many gross errors, no adequate censure has been inflicted. Cited from Act, Declaration, & Testimony, by The Reformed Presbytery
  • Currer Bell feels a sorrowful independence of reviews and reviewers; their approbation might indeed fall like an additional weight on his heart, but their censure has no bitterness for him. Cited from Charlotte Bronte and Her Circle, by Clement K. Shorter
  • The breath of censure has not dared to impeach the purity of his conduct, nor the eye of envy to raise its malignant glance to the elevation of his virtues. Cited from Washington's Birthday, by Various, Ed. by Robert Haven Schauffler
  • That this conjecture is not wide from the mark, I am induced to believe from the noticeable fact, which I can state on my own knowledge, that the same general censure has been grounded by almost every different person on some different poem. Cited from Biographia Literaria, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • Of this delicacy Horace is the best master: he appears in good humour while he censures; and therefore his censure has the more weight, as supposed to proceed from judgment, not from passion. Cited from The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2, by Edward Young
  • Much censure has attached to the Spanish government for its share in this unfortunate transaction; both in the appointment of so unsuitable an agent as Bobadilla, and the delegation of such broad and indefinite powers. Cited from History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella V2
  • In the modern history of the United States House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct (since 1966), censure has been used five times, most recently in December 2010 against Charles B. Rangel.
  • Many imaginative and many philosophical performances have lately shown that this censure has now become unjust; and much more forcibly answers the sarcastic question of Bohours than the thick quarto of Kramer. Cited from Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 1 (of 3), by Isaac D'Israeli
  • It, therefore, appears, from ecclesiastical history, that the right of inflicting shame by publick censure has been always considered as inherent in the church; and that this right was not conferred by the civil power; for it was exercised when the civil power operated against it. Cited from The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes, Vol. V, by Samuel Johnson
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