censure any

16 examples (0.03 sec)
  • I value not her censure any more than I should do her commendation. Cited from Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
  • My righteousness I hold fast and will not let it go, My heart doth not censure any one of my days. Cited from Sceptics of the Old Testament, by E. J. Dillon
  • Those who have long known him well have said to me that they have never heard him censure any one; that his forbearance and kindness are wonderful. Cited from Acres of Diamonds, by Russell H. Conwell
  • Mr. Wise, of the same state, asked the speaker if it was in order to move to censure any member for presenting such a petition. Cited from Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams, by Josiah Quincy
  • I should be sorry if by any observations, such as the preceding, I should be thought to censure any one for the morality of his feelings. Cited from A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume III (of 3), by Thomas Clarkson
  • She was too judicious a person to hold up to censure any habitual act of her husband, whatever might have been her own opinion, or however she might have remonstrated with him in private. Cited from The Continental Monthly, Vol. I, Jun, 1862, Number VI, by Various
  • Few in high life are altogether heartless, and all are ready to censure any exhibition of family pride, which is carried so far as to alienate the parent from the child. Cited from Lights and Shadows of Real Life, T.S. Arthur
  • ATHENIAN: All those who are ready at a moment's notice to praise or censure any practice which is matter of discussion, seem to me to proceed in a wrong way. Cited from Laws, by Plato
  • "Far, madam, be it from me to censure any conduct which as yet I have observed in Miss Wharton; she has too great an interest in my heart to admit of that." Cited from The Coquette, or The History of Eliza Wharton, by Hannah Webster Foster
  • Whatever his sentiments and motives might have been, this was no other than a revival of the old ministerial clamour, that a man cannot be well affected to the king, if he pretends to censure any measure of the administration. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II, by Tobias Smollett
  • Many censured Miss Merrill for her want of spirit, as they termed it, in again receiving his addresses, but I was too well pleased by his happy termination of the affair to censure any one connected with it. Cited from The Path of Duty, and Other Stories, by H. S. Caswell
  • Many censured Miss Merril for her want of spirit, as they termed it, in again receiving his addresses, but I was too well pleased by this happy termination of the affair to censure any one connected with it. Cited from Stories and Sketches, by Harriet S. Caswell
  • Motives are endlessly varied, while actions continue the same; and an acute penetration may not find it hard to select and arrange motives, suited to exempt from censure any action that a human being can commit. Cited from Arthur Mervyn, by Charles Brockden Brown
  • For, without intending to compliment the father or the mother, or to censure any others, I give it as my decided opinion that Mr. Adams is the most valuable public character we have abroad, and that he will prove himself to be the ablest of all our diplomatic corps. Cited from Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams, by Josiah Quincy
  • To censure any indecent expression, by whomsoever uttered, is, doubtless, consistent with the strictest regularity; nor is it less proper to obviate any misrepresentation which inattention or mistake may produce. Cited from The Works of Samuel Johnson, Vol. 10., by Samuel Johnson
  • Moreover, I cannot approve of the cruelty which is everywhere being practised against those who, following the judgment of Scripture and of the fathers, reject or censure any manifest abuse or error that in the course of time may have crept into the Church. Cited from The Scottish Reformation, by Alexander F. Mitchell