ceaseless change

21 examples (0.03 sec)
  • If we then turn to France, we meet again with similar evidence of ceaseless change. Cited from The Antiquity of Man, by Charles Lyell
  • Everything is ceaseless change; and the state which appears the most stable is already change, since it continues and grows old. Cited from A New Philosophy: Henri Bergson, by Edouard le Roy
  • All our instincts seem to speak of permanence; all our experience points to swift and ceaseless change. Cited from The Upton Letters, by Arthur Benson
  • Like water is the soul of man, From heaven it comes, to heaven it goes, And back again to earth in ceaseless change. Cited from The Development of the Feeling for Nature..., by Alfred Biese
  • In this world of constant and ceaseless change, man is most sensitive and responsive. Cited from The Science of Human Nature, by William Henry Pyle
  • With every motion of a muscle, whether great or small, with every process that can take place in the body, this ceaseless change of particles is going on. Cited from The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking, by Helen Campbell
  • Through these studies we have come to see that, while the universe is a place of ceaseless change, the quantities of energy and of matter remain unaltered. Cited from Outlines of the Earth's History, by Nathaniel Southgate Shaler
  • Its movements fill Nature with ceaseless change; and without their aid in wafting ships over the sea, commerce and civilization would have been scarce possible. Cited from Dorian, by Nephi Anderson
  • With an import grand and strange Are they fraught in ceaseless change As they post away; each one Stands eternally alone. Cited from The World's Best Poetry Volume IV., by Bliss Carman
  • Clouds passed across the blue sky, and their shadows upon the Sicilian panorama made ceaseless change of hue and outline. Cited from By the Ionian Sea, by George Gissing
  • Absolute unity of form and content: ceaseless change in ceaseless monotony. Cited from A Book Of German Lyrics,Various
  • On the swift current of the chasm stream they had worked but little, and the ceaseless change of scenery in this wonderful break between the mountain ridges held an ever-increasing fascination for them. Cited from The Gold Hunters, by James Oliver Curwood
  • Living matter may be symbolized by a stream; it is ever and never the same; life is a constant becoming; our minds and our bodies are never the same at any two moments of time; life is ceaseless change. Cited from The Breath of Life, by John Burroughs
  • The rush and hurry of it, the excitements, the ceaseless change. Cited from The Drums Of Jeopardy, by Harold MacGrath
  • This is the only aim that sees itself realized and fulfilled, the only pole of repose amid the ceaseless change of events and conditions, and the sole efficient principle that pervades them. Cited from German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VII
  • Often it quite escapes their attention that what they now regard as beautiful struck them as unattractive a short time before; and will, perhaps, when the ceaseless change of the fashions has driven it out of vogue, seem strange and unattractive once more. Cited from An Introduction to Philosophy, by George Stuart Fullerton
  • Should we follow back the recorded history of any people now civilized, we would always find evidence of ceaseless change; and the writings of ancient historians like Herodotus and Caesar and Tacitus give a great deal of information about the barbarous conditions from which civilization evolved. Cited from The Doctrine of Evolution, by Henry Edward Crampton
  • There in its last volcanic throes A dying world perhaps dissolves; Further still, where the sun-mist glows, A mighty, new-born sun evolves; Ceaseless change in an endless sky! Cited from Poems, by John L. Stoddard
  • The late poems of Aleardi are nearly all in this lyrical form, in which the thought drops and rises with ceaseless change of music, and which wins the reader of many empty Italian canzoni by the mere delight of its movement. Cited from Modern Italian Poets, by W. D. Howells
  • But, since those are the strongest through whom nature finds it, for the time being, easiest to vent her energy, and as the whole universe is in ceaseless change, it follows that the composition of ruling classes is never constant, but shifts to correspond with the shifting environment. Cited from The Theory of Social Revolutions, by Brooks Adams