caress thee

19 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Thou art so pale, I hardly dare caress thee, Too brown my fingers show against the white. Cited from Last Poems, by Laurence Hope
  • Thy father loves thee; I caress thee: yet still thou art sad. Cited from History of the Negro Race, Vol 1, by George W. Williams
  • Bless them, then, whose eyes caress Thee, as only thou canst bless. Cited from A Channel Passage and Other Poems, by Algernon Charles Swinburne
  • If he caress thee, Curse thee or bless thee, Thou must draw near, From him the worth of thy works to hear. Cited from The Poems of Emma Lazarus, Volume II
  • When all is joy, Without alloy, Thine earthly friends caress thee. Cited from Town and Country, John S. Adams
  • I'll kiss thee and caress thee, As in the ancient day I kissed the Emperor Henry, Who long has passed away. Cited from German Classics of the 19th & 20th Centuries, Vol. VI, Ed. by Francke
  • "Oh, Diana, will you promise faithfully never to forget me, the friend of your youth, no matter what dearer friends may caress thee?" Cited from Anne of Green Gables, Lucy Maud Montgomery
  • Then let my winds caress thee Thy comrade let me be: Since nought beside can bless thee, Return -- and dwell with me. Cited from Poems by the Bronte Sisters [as Bell Brothers] B#5
  • I think not that thou wilt regret me, for thou art too joyous and fair, So many are keen to caress thee, thy passionate midnights to share. Cited from Last Poems, by Laurence Hope
  • Dearest, God bless thee, Fold and caress thee, Unto thy cradle may good fairies fly! Cited from Child Songs of Cheer, by Evaleen Stein
  • Come, for my heart in your absence is weary,-- Haste, for my spirit is sickened and dreary,-- Come to the arms which alone should caress thee. Cited from The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3, by Various
  • I see thy graceful babes caress thee, I mark thy wise, maternal care, And sadly do the words impress me, The magic words -- that thou art fair. Cited from Vignettes in Verse, by Matilda Betham
  • Like a rich harp-string, yearning to caress thee, And hear thy sweet "MY FATHER!" from these dumb And cold lips, Absalom! Cited from My Three Days In Gilead, by Elmer U. Hoenshel
  • Other arms may press thee, Dearer friends caress thee, All the joys that bless thee Sweeter far may be; But when friends are nearest, And when joys are dearest, O, then remember me! Cited from Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886, by Ministry of Education
  • How was I wont to feel my pulses thrill Like a rich harp-string yearning to caress thee, And hear thy sweet 'my father!' from those dumb And cold lips, Absalom! Cited from Poems Teachers Ask For, Book Two, by Various
  • No more against my bosom press thee, Seek no more that my hands caress thee, Leave the sad lips thou hast known so well; If to my heart thou lean thine ear, There grieving thou shalt only hear Vain murmuring of an empty shell. Cited from Georgian Poetry 1920-22, by Various
  • How was I wont to feel my pulses thrill, Like a rich harp-string, yearning to caress thee, And hear thy sweet 'My father!' from those dumb And cold lips, Absalom! Cited from The American Union Speaker, by John D. Philbrick
  • I fear to bless thee, I hardly dare caress thee, Because I love thee with a love That overgrows my life; And as the time gets longer Its tender throbs grow stronger: My maiden troth but waits to be The fondness of the wife. Cited from Lippincott's Magazine, April, 1873, Vol. XI, No. 25, by Various
  • Bring thy little winsome graces And the sweets of glad embraces, Till the pleasures all are dancing Into mazy whirls entrancing; It may please the icy breast To despise thee and distress thee, But the burning hearts find rest When they bless thee and caress thee. Cited from Oklahoma and Other Poems, by Freeman A. Miller