captive specimens

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  • The average lifespan in the wild is seven years, though captive specimens can live twice as long.
  • It has been reported that at least some captive specimens will accept only live snakes as prey.
  • Water temperature may play an important role in the earlier sexual maturation of captive specimens.
  • Most captive specimens become tame after some time and with proper handling.
  • Most have been reported in Indian cheetahs, particularly in captive specimens kept for hunting.
  • However, captive specimens soon calm down and this behavior is lost.
  • Being the largest members of this genus, captive specimens will usually accept mice and other small rodents.
  • Despite this, much of what little we know about the short-tailed snake has been based on observations of captive specimens.
  • Captive specimens have been known to accept birds and small mammals.
  • Captive specimens have been recorded laying up to eleven eggs within four months, with between one and four eggs per clutch.
  • The maximum recorded total length is for a captive specimen.
  • Captive specimens will often bite when captured but become fairly docile with regular handling.
  • The two captive specimens in Paris both died in 1822 and are believed to have been the last of their kind.
  • Captive specimens have been observed making primitive tunnels spanning out from under a log or rock when given enough soil.
  • Captive specimens usually live around 8 years, while it lives up to 12 years in the wild.
  • Captive specimens have produced litters of two to seven young.
  • Captive specimens seem to benefit if provided with a box of damp moss in which to occasionally sit.
  • Captive specimens without access to soil have clean white plumage.
  • Knowledge of the African golden cat's reproductive habits is based on captive specimens.
  • Its feeding habits must have been versatile, since captive specimens were probably given a wide range of food on the long sea journeys.
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