captive import

37 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Info Captive import is a marketing term and a strategy for an automobile that is foreign-built and sold under the name of an importer or by a domestic automaker through its own dealer distribution system.
  • Various reasons have been suggested as to why captive imports often fail.
  • Not every vehicle that appears to be a captive import really is.
  • In Europe, there have been relatively few cases of captive imports, and most have been unsuccessful.
  • Captive imports were the US car makers initial response to the increased demand for economy cars.
  • They were manufactured in Germany and sold in North America as captive imports.
  • These were replaced by the smaller front-wheel-drive Aries, as well as several captive import models.
  • The inexpensive Chevette was retained even as sales declined, and was formally replaced by even smaller captive imports.
  • The chief reason domestic automakers market captive imports is because "it is cheaper to import those cars than to produce them" in the United States.
  • For countries that do not have native manufacturers or a development/manufacturing presence, a captive import is a vehicle not manufactured by the specific company that imported the vehicle but sold under its brand.
  • In the American market, captive imports "blurred national distinctions" because they have been designed and built elsewhere, but wear a domestic nameplate.
  • The company had avoided building a car for the subcompact market up until that time, preferring to use captive imports like the Dodge Colt instead.
  • Captive imports were the other response by U.S. car makers to the increase in popularity of imported economy cars in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • It is not considered a captive import in the U.S. because of the free-trade under the Canada-United States Automotive Products Agreement.
  • It then became a captive import for Chrysler.
  • It became a captive import - a foreign-built vehicle sold and serviced by Nash (and later by American Motors) through its dealer distribution system.
  • Enough cars remained in stock until the replacement Holden Vectra arrived in mid-1997, first as a captive import, but locally manufactured after several months.
  • The first proposals were to modify AMC's captive import by extending the Metropolitan with a station wagon type roof design to make room for four passengers.
  • Captive imports and badge engineering increased in the U.S. and the UK as amalgamated groups such as the British Motor Corporation consolidated the market.
  • This type of car has been around since the 1940s with the Crosley, and in the 1950s with the captive import, the Nash Metropolitan.
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