captive Africans

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  • Captive Africans from numerous societies in several African regions began pouring into the area as slaves from the late seventeenth to the late eighteenth centuries.
  • Gordon also participated in the transatlantic slave trade, but was not a major importer of captive Africans.
  • Some of the crew and captive Africans on the Arraganta were drowned or captured.
  • The Spanish captain and two captive Africans were killed in the battle (another African died later of his wounds), and the Joaquina sank.
  • All the 20-man crew and 192 captive Africans survived the sinking.
  • The Henrietta Marie was a slave ship that carried captive Africans to the West Indies, where they were sold as slaves.
  • Since importing slaves into Spanish-controlled Cuba was illegal, the slave traders smuggled the captive Africans ashore at night in small boats.
  • This can be verified by a study of census roles which reveal a mostly poor area, where people worked and survived by the labor of their own hands, rather than the forced labor of captive Africans and their descendents.
  • The close quarters and intentional division of pre-established African communities by the ship crew motivated captive Africans to forge bonds of kinship which then created forced transatlantic communities.
  • In the 17th and 18th centuries, captive Africans from the Gold Coast area, modern-day Ghana, were sent to Caribbean colonies.
  • The Antelope was a slave ship with more than 280 captive Africans aboard captured by the United States in 1820.
  • Contacted by Connecticut abolitionists soon after the Amistad arrived in port, Tappan focused extensively on the captive Africans.
  • While the crew and 220 captive Africans survived the shipwreck, 18 Africans died before the survivors were taken to Nassau.
  • Most African Brazilians are the direct descendants of captive Africans who survived the slavery era within the boundaries of the present Brazil, but also with considerable European and Amerindian ancestry.
  • In addition, thousands of captive Africans, who were liberated from foreign slave ships by the British navy after the abolition of the slave trade in 1807, were resettled as free persons in the Bahamas.
  • Most African Americans are the descendants of captive Africans held in the United States (or British controlled territories that would become the United States) from 1555 to 1865.
  • Competition with British-financed merchants, who had direct access to sources for the precious metals mined in Brazil, caused the Lisbon merchants to enter the more open market of Luanda where they purchased captive Africans.
  • Most African Americans are the direct descendants of captive Africans who survived the slavery era within the boundaries of the present United States, although some are -- or are descended from -- immigrants from African, Caribbean, Central American or South American nations.
  • As a result of the War of the Spanish Succession, the United Kingdom obtained the monopoly (asiento de negros) of transporting captive Africans to Spanish America.
  • Most Afro-Caribbeans are the descendants of captive Africans held in the Caribbean from 1502 to 1886 during the era of the Atlantic slave trade.
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