capillary condensation

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  • Info Capillary condensation is the "process by which multilayer adsorption from the vapor [phase] into a porous medium proceeds to the point at which pore spaces become filled with condensed liquid from the vapor [phase]." more...
  • However, due to their small size they run into problems with stiction, caused by capillary condensation among other forces.
  • This difference in filling rate can be a beneficial application of capillary condensation.
  • Scientific studies have been done on the relationship between relative humidity and the geometry of the meniscus created by capillary condensation.
  • Capillary condensation bridges two surfaces together, with the formation of a meniscus, as is stated above.
  • Hysteresis in capillary condensation has been shown to be minimized at higher temperatures.
  • In these structures, scientists use the concept of capillary condensation to determine pore size distribution and surface area though adsorption isotherms.
  • Synthetic applications such as sintering of materials are also highly dependent on bridging effects resulting from capillary condensation.
  • Capillary condensation is an important factor in both naturally occurring and synthetic porous structures.
  • Adsorption isotherm studies utilizing capillary condensation are still the main method for determining pore size and shape.
  • The Young equation provides reasoning for contact angle involvement in capillary condensation.
  • Experimentally, however it is seen that capillary condensation plays a large role in bridging or adhering multiple surfaces or particles together.
  • Sintering is a direct application of capillary condensation, because of the adhesion effects of dust and powders.
  • The Kelvin equation can be used to describe the phenomenon of capillary condensation due to the presence of a curved meniscus.
  • Capillary condensation in pores with r<10 nm is often difficult to describe using the Kelvin equation.
  • In contrast to the advantages of capillary condensation, it can also cause many problems in materials science applications such as Atomic Force Microscopy and Microelectromechanical Systems.
  • In scientific studies of capillary condensation, the hemispherical meniscus situation (that resulting from a perfectly cylindrical pore) is most often investigated due to its simplicity.
  • Starting from the assumption that two wetted surfaces will stick together, e.g. the bottom of a glass cup on a wet counter top, will help to explain the idea of how capillary condensation causes two surfaces to bridge together.
  • Therefore, the variables that govern capillary condensation most are the equilibrium vapor pressure and the mean curvature of the meniscus.
  • Neither systematic nor transient changes in humidity have an effect on long-term rehydroxylation kinetics, though they do affect instantaneous gravimetric measurements or introduce systematic error (i.e. through capillary condensation).
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