capable

All Adjective
76,055 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It was quite capable of getting you out of trouble more often than not.
  • The latter division showed itself to be far more combat capable than the former.
  • They became small groups with little influence, but still capable of violence.
  • It was by all means a very capable force that made little contact with the local population.
  • Life support systems must be capable of supporting human life for weeks, months or even years.
  • However, in part they are firm and thus capable of supporting flight.
  • Their own energy weapons have also been shown to be capable of destroying them.
  • "What is not capable of action cannot do anything by chance".
  • In some cultures, they are also said to be capable of human speech.
  • It was important to raise troops; it was just as important to provide capable officers to command them.
  • Great books are great teachers; they are showing us every day what ordinary people are capable of.
  • This resulted in larger and more powerful destroyers more capable of independent operation.
  • Many aircraft have since been passed on to the governments involved, as they became capable of taking over the operations themselves.
  • Though primarily designed for the day air superiority role, the aircraft is also a capable ground-attack platform.
  • What Lawrence needed to develop the idea was capable graduate students to do the work.
  • It comes in only a 4x4 and is a far more off-road capable model.
  • A single material may have several distinct solid states capable of forming separate phases.
  • Most, however, are capable of intelligence and human speech.
  • All air and surface units capable of rescue operations were dispatched to the scene at once.
  • However, computers initially were not even capable of having multiple programs loaded into the main memory.
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Words starting with capable

Meaning of capable

  • adjective (usually followed by `of') having capacity or ability
    capable of winning, capable of hard work, capable of walking on two feet
  • adjective (followed by `of') having the temperament or inclination for
    no one believed her capable of murder