cant word

23 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Hence it became a cant word, and is now as old as since the days of Henry VII. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose
  • It went so much deeper that if psychology had not become a cant word we might drag it into the explanation. Cited from Cheerful--By Request, by Edna Ferber
  • Don't think I undervalue the proper use and application of a cant word or phrase. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 11, September, 1857, by Various
  • There are a few cant words and expressions which are directly personal, and in many cases self-explanatory. Cited from The Colored Cadet at West Point, by Henry Flipper
  • Constitution is now the cant word of Parliament, tuning itself to the ear of the Nation. Cited from The Rights Of Man, by Thomas Paine
  • That such words were known to a wide audience is evidenced by the use of cant words in Jacobean theatre.
  • It is full of cant words, and reads like the work of a madman. Cited from Literary Blunders, by Henry B. Wheatley
  • A certain cant word called humbug had lately come into vogue. Cited from Virginians, By William Makepeace Thackeray
  • It contained twenty-four character sketches, gave the names of the chief tramps then living in England, and a vocabulary of their cant words. Cited from Character Writings of the 17th Century, by Various
  • He found fault with her Romany, which was thin and mixed with Gaelic and cant words. Cited from George Borrow, by Edward Thomas
  • I cannot help feeling as I stand here that there is something especially -- I might almost use a cant word and say monumentally -- interesting in a meeting like this. Cited from Modern Eloquence: Vol II, After-Dinner Speeches E-O, by Various
  • Cant words and phrases may be used in good faith from the force of habit, but their use subjects the speaker to a suspicion of insincerity. Cited from Our Deportment, by John H. Young
  • Klop, s. A gate, seemingly a cant word; perhaps a bell. Cited from Romano Lavo-Lil, by George Borrow
  • This record also distinguished between Gypsy and Cant words and again the attributions of the words to the different categories is consistent with later records.
  • A cant word among thieves, signifying a naked or poor man; also a lusty, strong rogue. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose
  • PAL is a common cant word for brother or friend, and it is purely Gipsy, having come directly from that language, without the slightest change. Cited from The English Gipsies and Their Language, by Charles G. Leland
  • Munjee, s. A blow on the mouth, seemingly a cant word. Cited from Romano Lavo-Lil, by George Borrow
  • I am not aware to what extent the term "little shavers" is applied to children in England, but in America it is as common as any cant word can be. Cited from The English Gipsies and Their Language, by Charles G. Leland
  • It is a very old Gipsy word, and indicates plainly enough the origin of the cant word "slang." Cited from The English Gipsies and Their Language, by Charles G. Leland
  • Harman includes a short dictionary of cant words.
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