cant term

20 examples (0.04 sec)
  • First and foremost they have got a great many cant terms, and you can judge a good deal from them. Cited from Nature and Human Nature, by T. Haliburton
  • A cant term for lead, because both are found on the tops of buildings. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose
  • This was a cant term that made some figure in the time of the Civil War, and during the Interregnum. Cited from The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 14, No. 389
  • I once heard this cant term used in a droll manner, about the end of the war, by a little girl, six years old, the daughter of a quarter-master. Cited from The Breitmann Ballads, by Charles G. Leland
  • To punch it, is a cant term for running away. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose
  • Cant terms formerly applied to poor silly half-naked men, or to sturdy beggars. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volumes 1-3, John Bunyan
  • This theatrical cant term is of ancient date. Cited from A Book of the Play, by Dutton Cook
  • The "warren" is the cant term which describes the whole party; but this requires a word of explanation. Cited from Curiosities of Literature, Vol. II (of 3), by Isaac Disraeli
  • Perhaps there is not, in the whole vocabulary of college cant terms, one more expressive than this, or that so easily conveys its meaning merely by its sound. Cited from A Collection of College Words and Customs, by Benjamin Homer Hall
  • A cant term in use at the University of Cambridge, Eng., explained in the following passage. Cited from A Collection of College Words and Customs, by Benjamin Homer Hall
  • It was first introduced as a cant term, and used to signify obtaining of goods, credit, or money, under false pretences. Cited from Real Life In London, Volumes I and II, by Pierce Egan
  • He may also remember hearing for the first time some cant terms or slang phrases, which have since forced their way into common use, in spite of the efforts of the purist. Cited from The Antiquity of Man, by Charles Lyell
  • A cant term, in the British universities, for preparing a student, by the assistance of a private tutor, to pass an examination. Cited from A Collection of College Words and Customs, by Benjamin Homer Hall
  • A cant term, in the English universities, for a hanger-on to noblemen and persons of quality. Cited from A Collection of College Words and Customs, by Benjamin Homer Hall
  • He then, in cant terms, with which his whole conversation was plentifully besprinkled, but which would be quite unintelligible if they were recorded here, demanded a glass of liquor. Cited from Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens
  • To this cant term hangs a tale apropos of the President. Cited from The Lincoln Story Book, by Henry L. Williams
  • Mentula is a cant term which Catullus frequently uses for a libidinous person, and particularly for Mamurra. Cited from The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus, by Caius Valerius Catullus
  • Cortes was fond of play, both at cards and dice, at which he was always good-humoured and affable, often using the cant terms customary on these occasions. Cited from History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. IV, by Robert Kerr
  • Louke: The precise meaning of the word is unknown, but it is doubtless included in the cant term "pal". Cited from Canterbury Tales and Other Poems, Geoffrey Chaucer
  • A name given to the person who with a whip in his hand, and a hat held before his eye, keeps the ring clear, at boxing-matches and cudgel-playing; also, in cant terms, a cloak. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose