cant of

247 examples (0.04 sec)
  • And as to your cant of living single, nobody will believe you. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 1 of 9, by Samuel Richardson
  • There never, indeed, was a character that possessed less cant of any description. Cited from Pelham, by E. B. Lytton, Vol. 4
  • If it did, if people suddenly cleared their minds of this cant of money, what would happen? Cited from Love and Mr. Lewisham, by H. G. Wells
  • Lord Byron wrote more cant of this sort than any poet I know of. Cited from From Cornhill to Grand Cairo by Thackeray
  • This is the common cant of those who become critics for the sake of distinction. Cited from Lectures on Art, by Washington Allston
  • She is a true lover of nature, without pretense or cant of any kind. Cited from Girls and Women, by Harriet E. Paine (AKA: E. Chester)
  • I meant, the cant of "Now I am upon my legs." Cited from The Diary and Letters of Madam D'Arblay Volume 2
  • In comment, as his writings on the war showed, he will fall in with the cant of the times. Cited from The Art of Letters, by Robert Lynd
  • He loved men more than the mockery and cant of courts. Cited from Diane of the Green Van, by Leona Dalrymple
  • Addison was not a man on whom such cant of sensibility could make much impression. Cited from Lives of the English Poets: Prior etc.
  • Time will prove whether they are the cant of hypocrisy or the language of esteem. Cited from Memoirs of Aaron Burr, Complete, Matthew L. Davis
  • Every one must feel the falsehood and cant of this. Cited from Walden, by Henry David Thoreau
  • The superb pictures in the house are a silent protest against the cant of progress. Cited from The Life of Froude, by Herbert Paul
  • He had gone through the University course with rather more than average success, and had the cant of unbounded intellectual sympathies. Cited from Elder Conklin and Other Stories, by Frank Harris
  • Owing to the cant of the track through the station, the step up into the train from the southbound platform is substantial.
  • This story is a pertinent example of the cant of Doing Good. Cited from The Quest of the Simple Life, by William J. Dawson
  • For the rest, the ordinary cant of connoisseur-ship on these matters seems in Italy even more detestable than elsewhere. Cited from At Home And Abroad, by Margaret Fuller Ossoli
  • There had been a time when the cant of such fools would have made Bunyan miserable. Cited from Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4, by Various
  • You hold disgrace and miserable poverty over my head, and cant of restoration and repentance! Cited from Vanguards of the Plains, by Margaret McCarter
  • It was called, in the cant of the trade, by the name of "Spider-work." Cited from Letters and Journals, Vol. 2, by Lord Byron
  • Next »